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Articles on Youth unemployment

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Makeshift shops have mushroomed as people try to make ends meet amid South Africa’s excessive unemployment. Hobermunemployment. an Collection/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Stereotypes about young jobless South Africans are wrong: what they’re really up to

Many unemployed young people are engaged in a variety of economic activities. These may not necessarily be recognised as a form of self employment or informal employment.
Students at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. Joblessness has hit even those with degrees. Photo by © Louise Gubb/CORBIS SABA/Corbis via Getty Images

Millions of young South Africans are without jobs: what are the answers?

Promoting entrepreneurship will help reduce unemployment in South Africa. But the government has to step up its game.
A group of young men wait on a road for work in South Africa. A staggering 74% of the country’s youth are jobless. Photo by Frederic Lewis/Getty Images

South Africa’s efforts to tackle joblessness can be more effective: here’s how

Relying solely on job placement as an indicator of successful intervention misses out on outcomes that are equally important, or more so, amid high structural unemployment.
Nigerian youths are often stereotyped and harassed by the police for being in possession of a laptop or iPhone. Photo by Olukayode Jaiyeola/NurPhoto via Getty Images

#EndSARS: What it feels like to be in the shoes of a young Nigerian

They are often framed as lazy and fraudulent and are constantly harassed by the police. Now, it seems they have had enough. We explore what it takes to be a young Nigerian living in Nigeria.
Centrelink queues shocked Australians but long before COVID-19 Western Sydney had job-poor neighbourhoods with very high unemployment rates. Loren Elliott/AAP

Recession will hit job-poor parts of Western Sydney very hard

Western Sydney’s growth-driven boom had ended before COVID-19 hit. Some neighbourhood unemployment rates were 2-3 times the metropolitan average, with female workforce participation as low as 43%.

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