Menu Close

Articles on DNA

Displaying 1 - 20 of 397 articles

A great hammerhead shark’s two eyes can be 3 feet apart on opposite sides of its skull. Ken Kiefer 2/Image Source via Getty Images

Why do hammerhead sharks have hammer-shaped heads?

The first hammerhead shark was likely the result of a genetic deformity. A biologist explains how shark DNA reveals hammerheads’ history.
Telomeres (red) at the ends of chromosomes protect your DNA from damage. Thomas Ried/NCI Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health via Flickr

Cells become zombies when the ends of their chromosomes are damaged – a tactic both helpful and harmful for health

The protective caps at the ends of chromosomes naturally shorten over time. Researchers found that direct damage can prematurely trigger senescence and contribute to age-related diseases like cancer.
Priscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg with Moshe Biton (right) and Aviv Regev (left). The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative is one of the major funders of the Human Cell Atlas. Chan Zuckerberg Initiative

The human body has 37 trillion cells. If we can work out what they all do, the results could revolutionise healthcare

Pioneered by the Human Cell Atlas consortium, our understanding of the human body is about to be transformed – and with it, the way we treat and prevent disease
DNA is a trove of personal information that can be hard to keep track of and protect. Boris Zhitkov/Moment via Getty Images

Genetic paparazzi are right around the corner, and courts aren’t ready to confront the legal quagmire of DNA theft

Both Macron and Madonna have expressed concerns about genetic privacy. As DNA collection and sequencing becomes increasingly commonplace, what may seem paranoid may instead be prescient.
Sea lions, otters and birds were some of the many wildlife species that were hit hard by the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska. Oil spills like these expose the wildlife to new contaminants and can be fatal. (AP Photo/Jack Smith, File)

Once the slick is gone: New tool helps scientists monitor chronic oil in Arctic wildlife

ToxChips study the changes in the DNA of animals exposed to contaminants, like those found in oil spills.
Climate change stresses plants, forcing them to turn off the cellular machinery that helps them grow. (Shutterstock)

How climate change stresses plants and alters their growth

The climate crisis makes it important to investigate and understand the mechanisms of plant growth if we are to keep agricultural crops sustainable.
New technologies can bolster the production of important crops to feed billions of people. Shutterstock

South Africa should rethink regulations on genetically modified plants

A regulatory approach will place an unnecessary burden on bio-innovators. This will discourage local investment for in-house R&D, as well as projects in the public sector.

Top contributors

More