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Articles on Neuroplasticity

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Nicola Sturgeon, first minister of Scotland and Douglas Ross, the Scottish Conservative Party leader, in a pre-election debate. PA Images / Alamy Stock Photo

Scottish independence: what’s at stake in May elections

A transcript of episode 13 of The Conversation Weekly podcast, including new research on neuroplasticity in the brain.
The colors in this microscope photo of a fruit fly brain show different types of neurons and the cells that surround them in the brain. Sarah DeGenova Ackerman

Astrocyte cells in the fruit fly brain are an on-off switch that controls when neurons can change and grow

Adaptable neurons are tied to learning and memory but also to neurological disorders. By studying fruit flies, researchers found a mechanism that controls neuroplasticity.
The average Canadian adult consumes more than triple the daily limit of 25g added sugar recommended by the World Health Organization. (Unsplash/muhammad ruqiyaddin)

Your brain on sugar: What the science actually says

Sugar triggers dopamine “hits” in the brain, making us crave more of it. Sugar also disrupts memory formation.
Many board games strengthen the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of the brains of players. This results in improved cognitive functions such as IQ, memory, information retention and problem-solving. (Shutterstock)

Play games with your kids this summer to boost their brains

From dyslexia, to dementia to schizophrenia, there is evidence that playing games can help, while boosting family connections and emotional wellbeing.
Biomedical engineering involves the application of engineering solutions to medical problems. Employment in the field is projected to grow 23 per cent from 2014 to 2024. (Shutterstock)

A war made me realize: The world needs biomedical engineers

One professor explains how war in Iran led her to a career in biomedical engineering - a rapidly growing field that offers students exciting opportunities to serve humanity.
Your pain is in fact produced in your head and it will produce it more readily and more intensely if you have what you think is clear evidence that something is wrong. Mislav Marohnić/Flickr

No brain, no pain: it is in the mind, so test results can make it worse

People develop a long-term problem after an episode of back pain if they expect to not recover. Steps by the medical sector to avoid catatrophising back pain by not suggesting scans will help.
People who stay mentally stimulated and physically active can delay onset of cognitive decline. Daniel Erkstam/Flickr

Older people may be better learners than we think

Older people may be able to learn more from visual information than their younger counterparts, according to a study published today in the journal Current Biology. “The take-home message the study authors…
It’s not all bad news for older brains. Man image via www.shutterstock.com

Aging brains aren’t necessarily declining brains

For years, conventional wisdom held that growing older tends to be bad news for brains. Past behavioral data largely pointed to loss in cognitive – that is, thinking – abilities with age, including poorer…
Childhood memories seem few and far between – if they still exist at all. So why can’t we dig them up as adults? Rob./Flickr

Neuron study helps explain why we forget

Memories from early childhood are notoriously elusive but why can’t we recall our most formative experiences? New research suggests it could be a case of the old making way for the new – neurons, that…

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