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Dehumanising sex workers: what’s ‘prostitute’ got to do with it?

Melbourne sex worker Tracy Connelly was brutally murdered in her van last week. In a sad irony, Connelly was killed metres from where sex workers and their allies demonstrated their support for a global…

A monument to a sex worker in Amsterdam. Is it time the media discourse around sex workers in society changed? mo's

Melbourne sex worker Tracy Connelly was brutally murdered in her van last week. In a sad irony, Connelly was killed metres from where sex workers and their allies demonstrated their support for a global campaign to draw attention to violence towards sex workers only a day before.

In comparison to the media coverage after fellow Melbourne woman Jill Meagher was murdered last year, the media silence surrounding Tracy Connelly was deafening for those interested in not only violence against women, but violence against sex workers.

Tracy Connelly, the woman behind the headline, had the love and support of her community and her long-term partner. This has been eloquently explored and compared to the coverage of Jill Meagher by Jane Gilmore in The King’s Tribune. Another question, however, needs to be asked: what are the effects and reasons behind a woman being described as a “prostitute” when reporting on the horrific end to her life?

Sex, and by extension sex for money, is conflated with notions of self. Our sexual identity becomes a signifier to other people about who we are, and in the case of Tracy Connelly, who we are in death. Both major Victorian newspapers, The Age and the Herald Sun, identified Connelly as a prostitute in their headlines. Both articles spoke about the inherent danger of her work, including her understanding of this danger and also her preference not to work in sex work.

Identifying victims of violent crime as “prostitutes” has a distancing effect: it makes “normal” women feel safe. This good girl/bad girl binary interacts with the normal man/client binary to create “extraordinary” circumstances within which this violence can occur. Arguably, when “good” women are murdered by men, this creates a threat to all women and a woman’s place/space of work or how outside of normalised sexual activities she steps is no longer relevant.

Referring to female sex workers as “prostitutes” in the media is not new, but it is a sobering reminder of how pervasive negative understandings of sex work and sex workers are. These understandings originate from various “expert” fields of knowledge including psychology, medicine, sexology, religious doctrine and various feminist perspectives, through which sex workers are positioned as dirty, diseased, sinful, deviant and victims.

The term “prostitute” does not simply mean a person who sells her or his sexual labour (although rarely used to describe men in sex work), but brings with it layers of “knowledge” about her worth, drug status, childhood, integrity, personal hygiene and sexual health. When the media refers to a woman as a prostitute, or when such a story remains on the news cycle for only a day, it is not done in isolation, but in the context of this complex history.

This stigma is far-reaching and arguably does more damage to women who work in sex work than the actual work. This stigma feeds into understandings of women that are violence-supporting and referring to victims of violence as “prostitutes” continues to “other” these women and locates them as somehow deserving: she knew the danger. More than that, it feeds into violence-supporting attitudes about all women.

While changing such embedded understandings about gender and sex work is slow going, there is movement happening in this space. Many activists and lobby groups are working to resist sex workers being positioned in such negative ways and assert their as human rights, as well as creating health initiatives that seek to redress negative stereotypes about women and men in general that are violence-supporting.

The ways that sex workers are portrayed in the media is also changing. However, the reduction of Tracy Connelly’s humanity to that of simply “prostitute” reminds us that there is still a way to go.

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74 Comments sorted by

  1. Warren Mills

    Director

    Anyone who places themselves in harm's way has taken a risk, willing or unwilling, that changes their status compared to the rest of society. Whether they are correctly described as "prostitute" "stunt motor cycle rider" "rock climber" is determined only by their profession, not prejudice.

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    1. Matty Silver
      Matty Silver is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Sex Therapist / Sex Commentator

      In reply to Warren Mills

      Dear Darren, That is a very judgemental statement, to compare a sex worker with a "stunt motor cycle rider' is deeply offensive.

      This is an excellent article, thanks Lizzie.

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    2. David Wright

      Electrician

      In reply to Matty Silver

      Is it the "rider" part that you find offensive? What's so offensive about comparing different professions?

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    3. Christine Kershaw

      logged in via Facebook

      In reply to Warren Mills

      ...sounds like your saying her murder is fair enough. That's the line of work she's in. Are you serious. Her life was as valuable, important, worthy as Jill Meagher. Obviously not as 'important' media coverage wise as a journalist murder being reported by journalists.

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    4. Jay Jay

      Corporate Drone

      In reply to Warren Mills

      So what you're saying then Warren is that it's ok to murder a stunt motor cycle rider or a rock climber?

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    5. Chris O'Neill

      Victim of Tony Abbotts Great Big New Tax

      In reply to Warren Mills

      "rock climber"

      He doesn't seem to have done much rock climbing. It perhaps would have been more accurate to say "car driver".

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    6. deborah Whitmore

      artist

      In reply to Chris O'Neill

      The patriarchy wants some women available to satisfy the desires of men, and of course, the safe women who bear children and are sexually dormant, under the marriage contract. But the men must always treat the wanton women with distain, whilst visiting them at night, the 2 must remain separate. Alienate and disempower the prostitutes, control, shame keep the status quo. AND keep visiting them.....

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    7. Warren Mills

      Director

      In reply to deborah Whitmore

      Dear Deborah

      I am not the person you should be asking this question of, but since you did ask; as individuals we fail to be accountable to contribute to the common good because most of us have no concept of what the common good is. Most of us are possessed by self indulgence and faulty idealism confused by wishful thinking. Those of us that do have a workable theory of the common good should invest whatever deposit of faith, hope and love we posess for the benefit of thoose we love, thoose we live amongst and ourselves.

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  2. Margaret Kalms

    Artist photographer

    We all know it is foolish to deliberately place ourselves in danger, but many occupations do this every day to give us services that we need. The people working in such dangerous jobs are usually given respect for their bravery.

    Yes, a stunt motorcycle rider knows about the risk, but when an accident results in a death, the media describe it as a tragic accident.

    But Tracy Connelly did not die in a tragic accident, she was brutally murdered! An horrific act of violence perpetrated deliberately…

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    1. Warren Mills

      Director

      In reply to Margaret Kalms

      No one should be injured or killed at work, unless it for a noble cause or it is a risk that the participant is happy to take for the rewards, whatever they are.

      The degree of risk is determined by balancing the importance, desirability or usefullness of the activity against the likelyhood of harm and the severity of harm.

      As far as I can tell, the usefulness of prostitution is usually entirely for money. If a woman (or a man) wants to put her/his life on the line for an activity of high known…

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    2. Margaret Kalms

      Artist photographer

      In reply to Warren Mills

      Warren, this comment is victim blaming. No amount of risk taking by a victim excuses someone from MURDER.

      When soldiers go to war, they know they risk their lives. If they are killed society rightly grieves for them and calls the people who did the killing our enemies.

      Men who assault, rape and murder women are criminals. These men are criminals regardless of her sexual, domestic or work situation.

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    3. Suzy Gneist

      Multiple: self-employed, employed, student, mother, volunteer, Free-flyer

      In reply to Warren Mills

      Who determines which causes are noble?
      Which 'activity' do you refer to as 'highly harmful' - the act of having sex or the act of transacting for it? Why so?
      You speak about this as if it was a one-sided issue and only down to sex workers to deal with - what about the other party? If there wasn't a demand, there wouldn't need to be a supply. Maybe it is worth looking at why this society still has a need for prostitution, or violence for that matter, since otherwise it wouldn't even be an issue. You observe one side, but the other is left out: if society cannot control the purchasers of prostitution, controls against harm will need to protect the suppliers human rights.

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    4. Warren Mills

      Director

      In reply to Margaret Kalms

      No one is justifying MURDER. But no one should try to justify women putting themselves in harms way by knowingly dealing with the sort of men who use prostitutes. The fact thay they are victims is regrettable, but their situation is in their control.

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    5. Warren Mills

      Director

      In reply to Suzy Gneist

      A noble cause is to take an unavoidable risk for the benefit of another, not just for money as there are many other less harmful ways of earning a wage.

      Have sex with strangers in exchange for money is a known harmful activity, don't you think? The risk exists in reality.

      Good luck with getting rid of the demand. If prostitution is legal, so also should hiring a prostitute. My point is that prostitutes purposefully put themselves in the postion of great risk, just for money.

      Just like putting your head in a lion's mouth is a very bad idea, but talking to the lion is probably not much of a risk control.

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    6. Dianna Arthur
      Dianna Arthur is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Environmentalist

      In reply to Warren Mills

      Yes, you are justifying murder, Warren. As for the clients of sex-workers they are from ALL strata of society. You probably have friends and colleagues who regularly use the skills of a sex-worker.

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    7. Warren Mills

      Director

      In reply to Dianna Arthur

      No I am not Dianna. You are deliberatly misconstruing my words.I have a very high view of humanity and the value of all life. But if you put your head in the lions mouth, you should not complain to the RSPCA that lions are monsters.

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    8. Dianna Arthur
      Dianna Arthur is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Environmentalist

      In reply to Warren Mills

      Please explain why you equate sex-work with zoo-keeping?

      A woman, who just happened to work for the ABC, was brutally murdered. Another woman who just happened to work in the sex industry, was brutally murdered.

      PS Lions are just lions, not monsters, they are what they are. Any zoo keeper accepts that reality.

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    9. Warren Mills

      Director

      In reply to Dianna Arthur

      I am talking about the conscious acceptance of risk by risk takers Dianna. I am sorry if you don't understand the metaphor.

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    10. Dianna Arthur
      Dianna Arthur is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Environmentalist

      In reply to Warren Mills

      I fully understand the metaphor, Warren, you equate people who use the services of sex workers with monsters.

      I do believe many men and not a few women would take issue with being disparaged as such.

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    11. Warren Mills

      Director

      In reply to Dianna Arthur

      I don't think you do understand the metaphor Dianna; they are never intended as an exact parallel.

      Not all prostitutes are risk takers with a death wish, not all of their customers are murderers, but some are in both cases and that is the problem.

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    12. Dianna Arthur
      Dianna Arthur is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Environmentalist

      In reply to Warren Mills

      Beg to differ Warren. You are the one who has placed himself in judgement of the sex industry and clearly don't enjoy having your words subjected to scrutiny.

      The murderer of either Ms Meagher or Ms Connelly may have been clients of sex workers (I know in the case of Ms Meagher that her killer was a regular client of the sex industry) however, that they are monsters is not a result of the sex industry. Has a great deal to do with the manner in which women are subjected to be judged as whores or madonnas, not unlike your POV here on this thread.

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    13. deborah Whitmore

      artist

      In reply to Warren Mills

      Mr Warren Mills. We do not live in a perfect world, and have never done so. Prostitutes exist because there is a market, simple as that. Men want sex, and they will pay for it, it will not disrupt their marriage, nor will their children find out. When MEN stop wanting paid sex, the industry will not exist anymore. I cannot see that happening. Obviously this prompts further discussion. Men create the market.........

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    14. Suzy Gneist

      Multiple: self-employed, employed, student, mother, volunteer, Free-flyer

      In reply to Warren Mills

      Are you saying men are monsters?

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    15. Suzy Gneist

      Multiple: self-employed, employed, student, mother, volunteer, Free-flyer

      In reply to Warren Mills

      Are you suggesting to solve the problem of violence by making prostitution illegal? How would this help and not just move it into the shadow economy?
      I would consider feeding your family of benefit to others (= noble cause)...
      You equate the people involved with animals does this somehow 'excuse' (justify) the violence in your view?

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    16. Warren Mills

      Director

      In reply to Suzy Gneist

      Dear Suzy

      If you read the string you will see that:

      I am not suggesting that prostitution should be illegal. Would you want someone you love to be one, even a successful non-victim one? I don't think there is anything noble about being a prostitute for any reason.

      How does use of a metaphor of putting your head in a lions mouth justify violence? I was making the point about risk taking behaviour and prostitutes putting themselves in harm's way

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    17. Warren Mills

      Director

      In reply to deborah Whitmore

      As we know, some are monsters, most probably just pathetic ordinary people who are drunl or have a distorted view about sexual relationships, some perhaps because they have been abused them selves

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    18. Warren Mills

      Director

      In reply to deborah Whitmore

      I more or less agree with your description of reality, but it is wishful thinking to expect men's selfish desire to change anytime soon. Meanwhile, prostitutes opportunistically satisfy the demand for illicit sex for their own reasons at their own risk.

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    19. Rebecca Graves

      Teacher

      In reply to Warren Mills

      Except that more women are murdered by their partners or husbands than by strangers so surely women who are in heterosexual relationships are putting their head in the lion's mouth?

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    20. Warren Mills

      Director

      In reply to Rebecca Graves

      Dear Rebecca

      My argument is about risk. It is ridiculous to say that wives are at risk of muder from their husbands as the likelyhood is very low. The risk of prostitutes being murdered or otherwise harmed is very high.

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    21. David Thompson

      Marketing Research

      In reply to Margaret Kalms

      "No amount of risk taking by a victim excuses someone from MURDER."
      Which kinda invalidates your silly accusation

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  3. Greg North

    Retired Engineer

    " In comparison to the media coverage after fellow Melbourne woman Jill Meagher was murdered last year, the media silence surrounding Tracy Connelly was deafening for those interested in not only violence against women, but violence against sex workers. "
    That is likely so because of the " fellow Melbourne woman " as against Tracy working in another profession be it called sex worker or prostituting as much as the media could have used the former description or none at all.
    " Referring to female…

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  4. David Wright

    Electrician

    In response to the author of the article:

    The word prostitute is used on the reporting of these crimes not in a deliberate attempt to dehumanise, or stigmatise, but because it is an important detail of the case. If the word sex worker was used, it would have the same meaning over time, with the effect of euphemism creep.

    I agree, this is a horrible murder. This is just a brutal, sad and nasty way to die. But why does it seem to happen with female prostitutes more often? There are probably a number of risk factors, including the type of men they are exposed to, and how society looks upon such men. Why aren't male prostitutes murdered so often?

    Non-prostitute women are reassured if the report says that they are prostitutes, this is for sure, because it means that it shouldn't happen to them. But, why is this a problem for the author?

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    1. Christine Kershaw

      logged in via Facebook

      In reply to David Wright

      Check your stats David, 'murder' doesn't happen more often to female prostitutes, than 'normal' women.

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    2. David Wright

      Electrician

      In reply to Christine Kershaw

      Happy to be corrected, thank you. So perhaps it's just simply disproportionate attention? Would you care to post that so I can educate myself?

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    3. Matty Silver
      Matty Silver is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Sex Therapist / Sex Commentator

      In reply to David Wright

      Dear David,

      More women in Australia are murdered by their husbands or partners then sex workers.

      And please don't think that sex workers are exposed to a "certain type of men" most of their clients are what we may call perfectly normal men from all sort of backgrounds, most of them married.

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    4. David Thompson

      Marketing Research

      In reply to Christine Kershaw

      Christine, both "sex worker" and "prostitute" are floating signifiers, with no external referent. To whit, there is no need for the media or anybody to change "discourses" about prozzies OTOH, in general, society regards sex-workers more lowly than most occupations. Suck it up.

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  5. Stephen H

    In a contemplative fashion...

    Until we get rid of our crazy Judaeo-Christian attitudes towards sex we cannot improve the condition of sex workers. We stigmatise them, we persecute them, and we treat the job as being one that nobody would actually want.

    We treat sex as dirty, as something that should not be talked about, and as something that teenage boys and girls should learn about through trial and error - and the Internet. We have one of the largest religions on Earth still preaching that every sexual act should lead to progeny - on a planet with seven billion people, the most procreative of whom are also the hungriest!

    There are many very good historical reasons for our attitudes to sex – but a good many more have gone by the wayside. Society needs to take a good hard look at itself and at the logic behind its attitudes. Once it fixes those attitudes it may have something useful to say about sex and sex work.

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    1. Warren Mills

      Director

      In reply to Stephen H

      Dear Stephen

      Please go and preach sexual liberation to the millions of dispossed children abandoned by their fathers and increasingly by their mothers and see if they may have preferred that their parents had treated sex as something other than for money or pleasure.

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    2. Jay Jay

      Corporate Drone

      In reply to Warren Mills

      And the "Won't somebody think of the children!" award goes to:

      Warren Mills...

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    3. Warren Mills

      Director

      In reply to Jay Jay

      I can see that you are really into serious debate Jay Jay, but thanks for the award. I am proud to receive it. I am happy to be found guilty of defending the defenceless.

      Being a gradfather has changed my view about what is really important. This is an experience that I hope you have one day.

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    4. Dianna Arthur
      Dianna Arthur is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Environmentalist

      In reply to Stephen H

      Well said, Stephen.

      The tragic deaths of Jill Meagher and Tracy Connolly clearly emphasise the dichotomy that good old double standards still have a strong grip on, and remain a distortion of our moral values.

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    5. Jay Jay

      Corporate Drone

      In reply to Warren Mills

      Well, if you start posting something worth debating seriously I'll be more than happy to join in; to date however you've posted nothing but moronic drivel.

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    6. Warren Mills

      Director

      In reply to Jay Jay

      I am happy to be accountable for my words and my role in society Jay Jay

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    7. Jay Jay

      Corporate Drone

      In reply to Warren Mills

      i0.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/original/000/200/420/BRTky.jpg

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    8. Stephen H

      In a contemplative fashion...

      In reply to Warren Mills

      Warren, you're confusing two totally separate issues. Sex and reproduction are certainly related, but the two issues very different. Next you'll be bringing up the risk of bestiality. And saying sex education shouldn't be in our schools because it encourages promiscuity.

      Try a logical argument. I am not arguing against providing support to children, I am pointing out that your attitude is part of what's gone wrong - this whole concept that sex and reproduction are inextricably linked. As a side note I would be interested to see how many of those abandoned children to whom you refer are considered members of the Holy Roman Catholic Church - and what said church is actually doing to prevent so many unwanted children (other than having lots of its priests practice non-reproductive sex with them).

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    9. Warren Mills

      Director

      In reply to Stephen H

      Dear Stephen

      Sex and procreation not inextricably linked? different subjects? beastiality? promiscuity? Catholic priests? failure of logic?

      Come now Stephen, didn't your mother teach you anything?

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    10. Stephen H

      In a contemplative fashion...

      In reply to Warren Mills

      Warren,

      I can either assume that you failed to understand the clear message I went for, or that because I included quite a few off-track comments you chose to ignore it.

      Sex and procreation are two different things. They are related, but humans (along with so many other animals) participate in sex for fun and pleasure AS WELL AS procreation. The person who pays a prostitute does not intend to parent a child. Your decision to confuse the issues says more about you than about how to solve our schizophrenic attitudes towards sex.

      If you want to have a sincere debate about these issues, then focus on what the issue actually is rather than crying "think of the children". At the moment, the only conclusion I can draw from your comments, and the way they veer off the actual subject, is that you don't want that debate.

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    11. Warren Mills

      Director

      In reply to Stephen H

      Dear Stephen

      Being the father of 3 kids who have produced 4 grandchildren and the fact that I have remained married to the same modern career woman who was among the first to have reliable birth control should count for something.

      Over this time, I have worked out what the clitoris is for. I am aware that it has nothing to do with procreation, as far as I can tell.

      Human life is for pleasure and sex is a powerful life-giving force, ideally shared with thoose who we make deeply human comitments…

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    12. Stephen H

      In a contemplative fashion...

      In reply to Warren Mills

      Okay, well - I'll start by pointing out that I have been happily married (to the same person) for twenty-five years. We do not have children, and the lack is not by choice. I am in a committed, monogamous, relationship.

      That said, it is not for me to judge when others make a decision not to be in a committed, monogamous relationship. I happen to like my life how it is, but if people want to make other life choices then go for it. As long as they are not hurting others, I see no problem…

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    13. David Thompson

      Marketing Research

      In reply to Stephen H

      Stephen, actually, there is a good argument that "our crazy Judaeo-Christian attitudes towards sex: create and sustain the demand for prostitutes in the first place.

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    14. Stephen H

      In a contemplative fashion...

      In reply to David Thompson

      I have to disagree, David. The Romans and Greeks had prostitution and prostitutes. Our understanding of sex in their societies has been somewhat clouded by some moralising historians (Suetonius and Gibbon, for instance), but we can be fairly confident that those societies had people who were paid to have sex with others. Whether Tiberius can be granted his minnows is probably in the same realm as Nero fiddling while Rome burned. The documents we rely upon were written by early historians whose discipline had not yet been clearly defined and who often repeated rumour and innuendo. Totally different from the modern professional historian (/s).

      I'm not saying that the ancients had it so good - but while I lay the blame for the current attitudes towards prostitution on cultural issues, I think we need to approach the subject rationally and without making unnecessary judgements.

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  6. Pat Moore

    gardener

    Thanks Lizzie for speaking out for Tracy.

    There's no word for the common and specialized crime of the rape and murder of women other than the generic 'homicide'. Gynocide should be a word because it's a fact of life/death. The murder of 'sex workers'/ 'prostitutes' ("to cause to stand before") is an active, wide spread and particularly vicious branch of this specialized misogynist crime. There's no word for that either because language is patriarchal. Puticide from the French for prostitute…

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    1. Warren Mills

      Director

      In reply to Pat Moore

      All the more reasons why these poor women might find better things to do with their lives

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    2. Stephen H

      In a contemplative fashion...

      In reply to Warren Mills

      Warren, what might "these poor women" find better to do? What is the problem with people who are employed for the purpose of providing pleasure to others? Do you have a problem with your barrista who served the morning coffee? Or your accountant, perhaps? Maybe with your lawyer - because we all know that lawyers have nothing good to do?

      Maybe I have just painted too broad a brush, but really - I only picked up what was already being worked with. There are many more contemptible "honest" jobs…

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  7. Rene Oldenburger

    Haven't got one

    Funny people you Australians, coming from The Netherlands and educated there as well, we had social studies where those involved in the particular subject were invited to speak out in front of the class and we could ask questions.

    This was a prostitute who introduced herself as a prostitute and had absolute no problem being referred to like that.

    Perhaps we all should follow the "eminent" Betty McLellan and refer to prostitute/sex workers as "occupied women".

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    1. Jay Jay

      Corporate Drone

      In reply to Rene Oldenburger

      Or maybe we can just do the usual corporate trick and fluff up their title a little. How about "Personal Release Engineer" or "Intimate Customer Engagement Technician" ;)

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    2. Matty Silver
      Matty Silver is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Sex Therapist / Sex Commentator

      In reply to Rene Oldenburger

      Hi Rene,
      I have been away from The Netherlands for a long time but as far as I know - there is no other word for "prostitute" and the Dutch are overall more liberal and accepting of the "profession".

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    3. Rene Oldenburger

      Haven't got one

      In reply to Matty Silver

      Hi Matty,

      There is a saying in Holland: disrespect a prostitute and you disrespect all women.

      There are several words for prostitutes in the Dutch language, but prostitute is accepted as the norm, also by prostitutes.

      It's all legal, most of them pay tax, they have their own union and most fill in the word prostitute or sex worker when filling in their tax papers.

      In this country prostitutes seem to be properties of various interest groups. One hand you got the Bible bashers and the other hand it is the feminists.

      They all seem to know what is good for them, but no one bothers to ask the prostitutes themselves.

      I mean who in his/her right mind refers to a prostitute as an occupied woman, and by occupied, it refers to being occupied by the patriarchy and men.

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  8. Stjepan Bosnjak

    logged in via Facebook

    I remember Jill working for the ABC being mentioned in the media a few times

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  9. Jena Zelezny

    research for second PhD in Humanities and Social Sciences (Performance Studies/Theatre & Drama/Dramatic Literature/Visual Arts) at La Trobe University

    I find it disconcerting and hypocritical that a junior academic in a university would write a simplistic article based on the concept of double standards and stigmatised stereotyping of prostitutes/sex workers when the employer of such a writer would exclude someone based on the fact that they once worked in the sex industry.

    I refer to a statement made my Prof. Sheila Jeffries from the University of Melbourne who proclaimed that an ex-sex worker would never be employed by any University.

    This policy as iterated by Jeffries, merely reinforces a separation of the university from the community and produces yet another aspect to the dynamic of knowledge as an exclusive product of theorists who have no substantial experience of that upon which they choose to comment.

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    1. David Thompson

      Marketing Research

      In reply to Jena Zelezny

      Yeah, you gotta laugh. A prostitute could share more wisdom about sex and gender in one hour over a fluffy-duck than the likes of Ms Jeffreys could in a lifetime.

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    2. Jena Zelezny

      research for second PhD in Humanities and Social Sciences (Performance Studies/Theatre & Drama/Dramatic Literature/Visual Arts) at La Trobe University

      In reply to David Thompson

      While I agree with your statement David, I also have to concede that I admire Jeffreys work on sex trafficking.

      I wanted to emphasise the separation created by certain academics from the subject of their study and the definite "better than" attitude which takes form as pathologising and/or patronising of that subject.

      Apologies are due to Prof. Jeffreys with regard to my mis-spelling of her name above.

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    3. David Thompson

      Marketing Research

      In reply to Jena Zelezny

      Jena, while I appreciate your point, there are also many people who appreciate David Irving's history of German tank strategy on the Russia front. If you get my drift. ;)

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    4. David Thompson

      Marketing Research

      In reply to Jena Zelezny

      Jena, on top of explicitly academically-focused learning/study/research, I have also learnt that equally valuable knowledge/expertise/wisdom accumulates merely by turning up year after year, as the experiences, accidents, mistakes, horrors, and miracles unfold. I have many conclusions from this latter source of knowledge. One of which is that privileged young women, in their 20s, with little no more life experience, let alone substance, than a PhD on sex/gender written, while they lived at home with Mum/Dad, have nothing to say on the topic worth listening to.
      The young women of that group who were supervised by the sexphobic/misanthropic sartorially-challenged Jeffries types have even less to say. Yet, here they are, popping up weekly on TC, with full time academic positions.

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    5. Jena Zelezny

      research for second PhD in Humanities and Social Sciences (Performance Studies/Theatre & Drama/Dramatic Literature/Visual Arts) at La Trobe University

      In reply to David Thompson

      David, you are using my comment as a platform for your particular brand of misogyny.

      My comment referred to "knowledge as the exclusive product of theorists." I did NOT mean to imply that the work of theorists/researchers has no value and I would separate myself from the comments you made about Prof. Jeffreys. I DID mean to imply that the university as a site of learning has a lot to learn and could benefit through a leap out of the ivory tower for a moment in order to humbly interact with what's…

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    1. Jena Zelezny

      research for second PhD in Humanities and Social Sciences (Performance Studies/Theatre & Drama/Dramatic Literature/Visual Arts) at La Trobe University

      In reply to Christopher Seymour

      I don't think you have thought this one through Christopher. Your logic needs some work.

      Who were the perpetrators of the homicides? That males are the killers and the victims doesn't really say much apart from reinforcing the fact that, in most cases, males are the perpetrators of both homicidal and otherwise violent crimes.

      Males are still the users and abusers of sex workers too. And males primarily still govern the country and the universities. Generally, attitudes regarding sex workers are hypocritical.

      Furthermore the author did not "complain" about media coverage and use of the term "prostitute", she reported the facts. Complaining is quite different to reporting.

      report