Articles on Biodiversity

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Maasai women on a conservation project in Kenya. Joan de la Malla

Indigenous peoples are crucial for conservation – a quarter of all land is in their hands

A new map shows that more than 25% of all land outside Antarctica is held and managed by Indigenous peoples. This makes these communities vital allies in the global conservation effort.
A life reconstruction of Brindabellaspis stensioi, an unusual placoderm fish from the 400-million-year old Burrinjuck reef in New South Wales, Australia. Jason Art, Shenzhen

Fossil fish with platypus-like snout shows that coral reefs have long been evolution hotspots

Brindabellaspis had eyes on the top of the head, facing upwards, and a skull stretched into a long and broad snout. Although around 400 million years old, it was clearly a specialised fish.
Mala, also known as rufous hare-wallabies, will be protected behind an enormous cat-proof fence. Donald Hobern/Flickr

The future is fenced for Australian animals

Conservation fences create a few hundred square kilometres of safety for vulnerable native animals surrounded by 7.6 million lethal square kilometres.
The “hammerhead” of Diversibipalium multilineatum. This species can reach 40 centimeters (16 inches) in length. Pierre Gros

Yes, giant predatory worms really are invading France

Several giant terrestrial Plathelminth species have invaded France and its overseas territories, threatening biodiversity. Thanks to participatory science, the invasion is finally recognized.
Nature offers many benefits to people. (Shutterstock)

It pays to invest in biodiversity

Governments around the world have vowed to halt the loss of global biodiversity by 2020, but without more investment, we'll miss some of the targets.
Several studies have shown that spending time in nature is good for health. Now new research has looked specifically at asthma and found that living in green neighbourhoods protects children from developing the condition. from www.shutterstock.com

Children living in green neighbourhoods are less likely to develop asthma

New research shows that children who live in greener neighbourhoods are less likely to develop asthma, and that the more diverse the plant life is, the more they are protected.
The thorny devil, one of Australia’s many remarkable and unique animals. Euan Ritchie

Australia’s draft ‘Strategy for nature’ doesn’t cut it. Here are nine ways to fix it

Most of Australia's plants and animals are found nowhere else on Earth. This remarkable biodiversity requires a bolder, brighter conservation vision.

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