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Indonesia’s Samalas volcano may have kickstarted the Little Ice Age

A volcano in Indonesia may be the location of a massive “mystery eruption” that has perplexed volcanologists for decades…

Let’s start an ice age. asgeirkroyer

A volcano in Indonesia may be the location of a massive “mystery eruption” that has perplexed volcanologists for decades, according to a new study. The eruption occurred in 1257, and it could also be one of the volcanoes that started a 600-year cold period called the Little Ice Age.

Volcanic eruptions release sulfur into the atmosphere, which eventually falls back on Earth and gets deposited on ice sheets. These sulfur samples can be identified in ice cores obtained from polar regions. From the records, Clive Oppenheimer, a volcanologist at the University of Cambridge, found that an eruption in 1257 may may have been the largest release of sulfur in the past 7,000 years.

But where did the eruption happen? “Not being able to find the volcano can be discomforting,” said Thomas Crowley, a geoscientist at the University of Edinburgh. “If the sulfur wasn’t released by a volcano, it means something very strange is going on that we don’t know about.”

But locating the volcanic source can be tricky. For the 1257 eruption, there were many candidates: Okataina in New Zealand, El Chichón in Mexico, Quilotoa in Ecuador and Samalas in Indonesia (next to Mount Rinjani).

To narrow down their choice, Franck Lavigne at the Pantheon-Sorbonne University and his colleagues had to consider many types of data, just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “They do a great job of combining historical data, geochemistry evidence, carbon dating, and physical data to arrive at the conclusion,” said Erik Klemetti, a geoscientist at Denison University and author of the popular Eruptions blog. “Their case for it to be Samalas is compelling.”

The historical data comes from Babad Lombok, which are records written down on palm leaves in Old Javanese. They describe a horseshoe-shaped collapse, which can occur when empty space is created under a mountain on ejection of large amount of magma.

Carbon dating is a commonly used technique, but its estimates are not accurate enough. Lavigne had to rely on comparing geochemical fingerprints, which gives a unique ratio of chemicals present in the ash from every volcano. The two sets of these geochemical fingerprints come from volcanic ash in ice core samples and the possible site of a volcano.

“In this study, the error margins for the chemical analysis are quite large,” said Rebecca Williams, a volcanologist at the University of Hull. “But I appreciate that matching the ice core data with volcanic samples is very difficult.” This is because the ice core samples often yield only one or two grains of the ash, which need to be subjected to many tests.

Volcanic eruptions, especially those containing a lot of sulfur, can have a large impact on the climate, which then have social, economic and environmental knock-on effects. An 1815 eruption in Tambora, Indonesia is infamous for producing the “year without summer”, one of the chilliest summers in Europe’s history, which was followed by mass shortage of food.

Lavigne speculates that the Samalas volcano could have similar impacts. One such speculation is about the thousands of bodies recovered from Spitalfields in London. Many of these were found to have been shoved in a single grave, indicating some sort of crisis. According to Lavigne, they’ve been recently dated to 1258, only one year after the Samalas eruption.

The Babad Lombok also notes that the volcanic eruption destroyed Pamatan, then capital of the Lombok kingdom. “There is a good possibility that an ancient city lies beneath the ash and pumice deposits of the Samalas volcano,” said Oppenheimer, also a co-author of the study. “Ruins under such deposits are not so uncommon,” added Williams, but finding a whole city might be.

More important, though, could be Samalas volcano’s role in triggering the Little Ice Age. In a 2012 study in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, scientists used climate models to show that a series of eruptions may have triggered the onset of the Little Ice Age. Although the precise timing varies somewhat, this period is typically considered to have occurred between 1250 and 1850.

“A single eruption could not have caused such long-term climate change,” said Klemetti. “Instead, it had to be a sequence of large eruptions, one of which might be the Samalas volcano.”

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12 Comments sorted by

  1. John Doyle
    John Doyle is a Friend of The Conversation.

    architect

    Where is Samalas volcano?
    It's supposedly on Lombok, but in Google Earth no such name exists.
    There is Rinjani and that's it. No side vents are named.
    Explain please???

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    1. Akshat Rathi

      Science and Data Editor at The Conversation

      In reply to John Doyle

      Hi John,

      The Samalas volcano is part of the Rinjani complex. It's next to mount Rinjani. I've added that for clarification.

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    2. John Doyle
      John Doyle is a Friend of The Conversation.

      architect

      In reply to Akshat Rathi

      Thanks, Akshat
      Can you provide the coordinates of the vent?
      Google shows nothing so the actual vent cannot be detected.
      Strange for an important vent not to be listed?!

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    3. Akshat Rathi

      Science and Data Editor at The Conversation

      In reply to John Doyle

      If you click on the Proccedings link, you'll find that the journal paper is open access. In it the authors point out the exact location.

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    4. John Doyle
      John Doyle is a Friend of The Conversation.

      architect

      In reply to Akshat Rathi

      Thanks, but no, except to say "adjacent"
      Somewhere within 360 degrees of Rinjani, which itself is no slouch!
      Maybe you know another open access map?

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    5. John Doyle
      John Doyle is a Friend of The Conversation.

      architect

      In reply to John Doyle

      Nah, I reckon this is all made up!!!
      There is no such volcano as Samalas. Someone has made it up!!
      According to Wikipedia the Rinjani caldera itself was formed in 1257. That makes sense. It's BIG!
      There has been a cat and mouse game about revealing the volcano's name back in 2012.
      See the footnotes attached to the reference to the caldera in Wikipedia.
      I cannot believe an important volcano is unknown in any standard reference.
      What going on???

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    6. Darmawan Salihun

      Software Engineer

      In reply to Akshat Rathi

      I suppose the eruption was the cause of the Segara Anak lake. I'm not vulcanologist per se but if looking at what happened when Lake Toba formed, it must've been a quite similar process.

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  2. James Hill

    Industrial Designer

    I remember reading in the foremost Victorian Historical Novelist, Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution , 1837, that a volcanic event in the West Indies brought on a weather effect that caused a famine which toppled the Ancien Regime.
    Is this relevant to the article?

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    1. John Doyle
      John Doyle is a Friend of The Conversation.

      architect

      In reply to James Hill

      No, that would have been Laki in Iceland in 1783-4. It was amajor event lasting 8 months and affected lands as far away as Russia.

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    2. James Hill

      Industrial Designer

      In reply to John Doyle

      Thanks, John, for that information.
      Carlyle was very insistent on its effect of being a precipitating factor in the French Revolution.
      Crop failures, famines, a consequent diminution of taxes and the necessity to call the first National Parliament in one hundred and seventy odd years.
      All down to a volcanic eruption.
      Well Carlyle was an historian who didn't miss it.
      Unlike those who followed?

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    3. John Doyle
      John Doyle is a Friend of The Conversation.

      architect

      In reply to James Hill

      It wasn't the only factor, James. The aristocracy and it's refusal to accept taxation did as much damage. They were spending money they couldn't afford to arm the colony that became the USA, who never paid them back a cent!

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    4. James Hill

      Industrial Designer

      In reply to John Doyle

      But those starving peasants would have been able to pay their taxes had that famine not interceded.
      And the French had recently lost the world's first Global war which they had precipitated by urging their Indian allies to scalp the English colonists expanding over the Appalachian mountains.
      Eventually the British, yes the British, not the English defeated The French with our own James Cook involved surveying the St Lawrence Seaway to help defeat French North America.
      But, yes, the French aristocrats were like today's Australian mortgage holders, totally unconcerned about debt, until forced to call a parliament to increase taxes on the third estate.
      Or, as we know them, the "left wing".
      Whom they failed to "control".

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