Australian National University

ANU was established, in 1946, to advance the cause of learning and research for the nation. It is consistently ranked among the world’s best universities and many ANU graduates go on to become leaders in government, industry, research and academia.

Links

Articles (1 - 20 of 1,129)

A Type Ia supernova designated SN 2014J in the galaxy M82, captured by the Hubble Space Telescope. NASA, ESA, A. Goobar (Stockholm University), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

Short, sharp shocks let slip the stories of supernovae

When we look up at the night sky, it’s easy to feel as though the stars we see have always been, and always will be, there. But just like ourselves, stars are born and die. And when they die, they sometimes…
Academic publishers are attempting to build a walled garden around their content, blocking it off from public eyes. the.Firebottle/Flickr

Publisher pushback puts open access in peril

A new policy by publisher Elsevier is threatening to wind back the gains made by the open access movement.
It takes time, but this is how a real consensus is built. EPA/NIELS AHLMANN OLESEN/AAP

We need real consensus, not Bjorn Lomborg’s illusion of it

There is a way for governments to find out the consensus on global issues such as climate change. But it involves painstaking, complex work, and an end to the adversarial clash of competing ideologies.
A Syrian boy sits on the rubble of a demolished house. Many ordinary Syrians just want peace – though not necessarily if that means appeasing their nation’s ruthless leader. AAP Image/ Care Australia/ Alain Lapierre

Western leaders must heed Syrian concerns before appeasing Assad

While many insist that the West should appease Syria's Assad regime, this ignores the wishes of many ordinary Syrians – who are the key to defeating Islamic State and other extremists in Syria.
Films such as Avatar idealise indigenous people as Noble Savages, enjoying simple and uncorrupted lifestyles until contact with colonisers. Nicole Hanusek

Anthropologists do well in movies, indigenous peoples not so much

In a recent study, of the 53 films watched that had at least one anthropologist as a character, just under half belonged to the horror genre. Why should that be the case? And how were indigenous peoples in those films portrayed?
The Joint European Torus (seen here with a superimposed image of a plasma) is one of the machines helping to unlock fusion power. Wikimedia Commons

Nuclear fusion, the clean power that will take decades to master

Why don't we have nuclear fusion power yet? Because it involves taming plasmas at temperatures far hotter than the Sun's core. But the good news is that physicists are slowly but surely figuring out how.
Given the increasing number of vaccines recommended for adolescents and adults in Australia, the newly announced initiatives are a very good idea. Wellcome Images/Flickr

New register shows importance of vaccination beyond childhood

Tucked away in the budget papers is an intitiative worthy of applause – the establishment of an adult immunisation register and the expansion of the childhood register to include adolescents.
Tony Abbott and Greg Hunt at last year’s Green Army launch. Funding for the initiative has been slimmed down but is still more than A$700 million. AAP Image/Britta Campion

Federal Budget 2015 – environment experts react

The Federal Budget 2015 makes little mention of emissions reductions or renewable energy, but does feature funding boosts for drought assistance and the Great Barrier Reef. What else is in?
For every $1000 of assets the pension will be reduced by $3 a fortnight, under changes proposed in the federal budget. AAP Image/Alan Porritt

Missed opportunities on coherent pension policy reform

The government has dropped plans to index age pensions to CPI and opted instead to tighten income and assets test. These are welcome changes but more needs to be done.
There were no nasty surprises for the arts in the 2015 Budget – but plenty of worrisome rhetoric. Mick Tsikas/AAP

There’s money for the arts in the budget – but with strings attached

There were no truly nasty surprises in last night's Budget for the arts – but clear discomfort was expressed with the "arms-length" approach that hitherto has guided the allocation of arts funding.
Australian aid can make a difference to the lives of millions – but there are few votes and little media interest in it, so it’s an easy target for budget cuts. John Bransby/Department of Foreign Affairs

A fair budget? Not for the poor losing Australian aid in record cuts

Foreign aid will fall to close to 90 cents in every A$100 of federal government spending in the 2015 budget -- its lowest level ever.
Prime Minister Tony Abbott and Social Services Minister Scott Morrison hope the government’s childcare policy will encourage more Australians to enter or re-enter the workforce. Paul Miller/AAP

Childcare package neither bold or sustainable

Making the case for subsidising childcare is not as simple as it might seem, and the government's new childcare package may not pay for itself.
From Siberia to Roebuck Bay – the godwits reach the mangrove swamps. John Wolseley, Western Australia (2012). © John Wolseley

John Wolseley, artist, emerges as a lyrical poet and a prophet

John Wolseley’s exhibition Heartlands and Headwaters, which opened last month at the National Gallery of Victoria, may be the most important exhibition about art and the environment to be held in Australia for a generation.
Graeme Macfarlane (Goro) and Hiromi Omura (Cio-Cio-San) in Opera Australia’s Madama Butterfly (2015). Jeff Busby

Is it time for Madama Butterfly to flutter by?

Opera Australia has once again posted a major operating loss and is weathering criticism for its very safe repertoire. Both these points merit consideration in the federal government's National Opera Review.
It was a novelty when Conservative leader David Cameron had to enlist Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg’s support to govern, but Britons may have to get used to minority government. EPA/Andy Rain

What Westminster can learn from minority government in Australia

The UK is poised for another minority government, this time possibly with a hung parliament. Australia's long experience of such arrangements offers lessons in how to manage minority government.
One of the works on display at Earth and Sky:John Mawurndjul’s Mardayin ceremony 2000 (detail). Natural pigments on eucalyptus bark, 170 x 78 cm. Don Mitchell Bequest Fund 2000. Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney. © John Mawurndjul. Tarrawarra Museum of Art

Enthusiastic spirit: John Mawurndjul at Tarrawarra

Hetti Perkins has curated an exhibition of bark paintings by John Mawurndjul and Gulumbu Yunupingu that is currently on display at Tarrawarra Museum of Art. Who are these artists – and how have their lives shaped their artworks?
Treasury Secretary John Fraser now has plenty of company in calling for a ‘fundamental rethink’ of retirement income policy. AAP/Lukas Coch

Time to listen to the evidence for a rethink of super tax concessions

Over the last six months a public consensus has emerged among academics, think tanks, community organisations, elements of the superannuation industry and most politicians about superannuation.

Authors

More Authors