Sections

Services

Information

US United States

Australian National University

ANU was established, in 1946, to advance the cause of learning and research for the nation. It is consistently ranked among the world’s best universities and many ANU graduates go on to become leaders in government, industry, research and academia.

Links

Articles (1 - 20 of 1,035)

The US plans to arm and train ‘moderate’ rebels in Syria in addition to air strikes to defeat Islamic State forces. EPA/US Air Force

US plan to train ‘moderate’ Syrian rebels raises troubling questions

The United States' reluctance to become decisively committed to the complex quagmire in Syria is understandable. However, its plan to insert a US-trained-and-equipped “moderate rebel” force into the mix…
Julianne Moore’s star turn in Still Alice provides a lesson in understanding neurodegenerative diseases. Icon Film

Still Alice, and the advocacy for Alzheimer’s in fiction

Still Alice – starring Julianne Moore – tells the story of Alice Howland, a linguistics professor diagnosed with a form of early-onset Alzheimer’s Disease. Moore has already netted a Golden Globe and is…
Tom Uren gave a lifetime of service to his country: first in war, then as a campaigner for peace, a government minister and, in his later years, a mentor to many. Australian Information Service 1983/National Archives of Australia

Tom Uren, a ‘Big Man’ in his political vision and in person

Tom Uren was a “Big Man” not only in stature but in his public life. Uren, who has died at the age of 93, was born into a working-class household. Typical of the 1920s and ‘30s, he had a limited formal…
Can you save time and money with a half-filled fuel tank? Flickr/Michael Coghlan

Can you save money at the bowser by only half-filling the fuel tank?

Fuel prices may be at historic lows at the moment but when they rise again, what is the best strategy to save money at the bowser? There are many suggestions for saving money such as when and where to…
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics image of a supernova explosion discovered by Johannes Kepler in 1604. Flickr/X-ray: NASA/CXC/NCSU/M.Burkey et al; Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Our oceans give new insights on elements made in supernovae

Our understanding of heavy element production in supernovae, exploding stars way beyond our solar system, may need to change following some discoveries we have made looking not to the skies, but deep under…
Michael Pezzullo is spearheading far-reaching changes in doctrine and organisation of Australian immigration and border security. AAP/Stefan Postles

Tracing the far-reaching changes in immigration and border protection

The Australian government is in the throes of a major recasting of traditional immigration and border security doctrines and institutions. The changes are being led by the incoming secretary of the newly…
Blowhards? The debate over wind turbines is heated, so it’s best to rely on solid science. Fir0002/Flagstaffotos/Wikimedia Commons

Wind turbine studies: how to sort the good, the bad, and the ugly

Yesterday, The Australian ran a front-page article about what it called a “groundbreaking” new study on wind turbines and their associated health impacts. The study supposedly found a trend between participants…
The government’s ad spruiking proposed changes to higher education. Is it legal? And if so, should it be? Youtube screen grab

The difference between government advertising and political advertising

The federal government’s recent television advertisement spruiking the benefits of the proposed changes to higher education have raised the ire of not only the opposition but also taxpayers who have reportedly…
Nick Cave, 1973, gelatin silver photograph by Ashley Mackevicius. Gift of the artist 2006, National Portrait Gallery, Canberra

Celebrating Melbourne bohemians at the State Library of Victoria

Goths, punks and hipsters roam the streets, wilfully asserting their counter-cultures. But in an age of cultural appropriation, is this resistance just another way of fitting in? In 2015 can anyone truly…
Family First senator Bob Day’s proposed changes to Section 18C have been given fresh prominence since the Charlie Hebdo attacks. AAP/Lukas Coch

Charlie Hebdo attacks provide a false pretext for 18C debate

Early in 2014, federal Attorney-General George Brandis released a proposal to significantly amend our law against racial vilification, Sections 18C and 18D of the Racial Discrimination Act, on the strength…
Any discussion of ‘mateship’ in 2015 will inevitably exist in the shadow of the centenary of the landings at Gallipoli. Australian War Memorial

Book review: Mateship – A Very Australian History

In late 2007, a couple of months after our last HSC exam, one of my best friends punched me. In hindsight, I probably deserved it. We were 18, liberated from school and newcomers to alcohol. To make a…
Zed Seselja led government members of the Senate inquiry in dissenting from its findings on the impacts of inequality in Australia. AAP/Alan Porritt

Senate report shows why Australia needs to talk about inequality

Bridging our growing divide: Inequality in Australia is an important report tabled without fanfare in the Senate by its Community Affairs References Committee. The report is clearly argued and well-buttressed…
James Turrell, Raemar pink white 1969, Shallow space construction: fluorescent light, 440 x 1070 x 300 cm, Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Los Angeles, California. National Gallery of Australia

Experiments with light: James Turrell dazzles at the NGA

James Turrell is a veteran Californian artist who throughout a career spanning almost half a century has employed light as a vehicle through which to manipulate the viewer’s perception of space. The Turrell…
Watch where the foot falls if you want to avoid a costly no ball. Flickr/brianac37

Fast bowlers who bowl no-balls in cricket need to do the maths

Good fast bowlers add plenty of spice to the game of cricket but they’re also prone to bowling no-balls. If they just started their run ups from a little further back most could probably eliminate no-balls…
Avoiding food poisoning could be as simple as using an esky to transport your food to the picnic. oliveromg/Shutterstock

Health Check: how to avoid food poisoning at summer picnics

Warmer temperatures and eating outside go hand-in-hand, but picnics can sometimes lead to nasty surprises. Food poisoning is unsurprisingly more common in summer months. Every Australian experiences food…
How to deal with your Typical Climate Change Denier who turns up to the summer barbecue. Flickr/Andrew Kenworthy

Twelve ways to deal with a climate change denier – the BBQ guide

The end of the year is nigh and it’s a time for Christmas and New Year parties and gatherings. In the southern hemisphere that means barbecues and beaches. In the northern hemisphere it’s mulled wine and…
A man relaxes in some decidedly un-Scottish weather outside the venue for this year’s Commonwealth Games in Glasgow. AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Scorching 2014 sees records tumble in 19 European countries

It’s clear: 2014 has been a scorcher. As well as probably being the hottest year on record globally, regional and local climate records have tumbled too. Australia recently had its hottest spring on record…
Got him: nightwatchman Nathan Lyon was bowled by Mohammed Sharmi last week. AAP/David Mariuz

Maths test: why using a cricket nightwatchman is off the mark

Imagine you are captain of the national cricket team. With 20 minutes left in day one of a test match, your top-order batsman is dismissed. Do you employ a nightwatchman? That is, do you send in a tail-end…
Non-cognitive skills like perseverance and hard work might be more accurate predictors of success than literacy and numeracy quizzes. Shutterstock

School should be about more than just measuring intelligence

Who do you think would do better at school or in the workplace: someone who is smart, but lazy, or someone who is not naturally brilliant but will keep working at a problem until they get it right? Intuitively…

Authors

More Authors