Case Western Reserve University

Case Western Reserve was originally founded in 1826. What began as two separate institutions — Case Institute of Technology and Western Reserve College — federated in 1967 to form Case Western Reserve University, which immediately became one of the country’s leading research institutions.

Case Western Reserve supports about 100 designated academic and research centers. The eight schools and college offer close to 200 top-ranked undergraduate, graduate and professional programs that range from arts, law and humanities to engineering and medicine.

Case Western Reserve counts 15 Nobel laureates (including the first American scientist to receive the prize) among our current and former faculty and alumni.

About 10,000 students — 40 percent undergraduate — are enrolled at the university, representing all 50 states and more than 100 countries.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 119 articles

In 2014, this boy was affected by what activists say was a gas attack on the Syrian town of Telminnes; the most recent chemical attack was reported in late November, 2018 REUTERS/Amer Alfaj

Syria may be using chemical weapons against its citizens again – here’s how international law has changed to help countries intervene

For decades, international law did not allow one country to attack another that was using chemical weapons on its own people without UN approval. That’s changed, which means trouble for Syria.
Twenty-nine-year-old Rep.-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest woman to be elected to Congress, talks with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. AP Photo/Susan Walsh

Criticism of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s clothes echoes attacks against early female labor activists

Striking 20th-century garment workers wore their best dresses and hats to send a message that they had the right to be taken seriously and have their voices heard.
Pakistani religious groups protest against a Supreme Court decision that acquitted Asia Bibi, who was accused of blasphemy, in Islamabad, Pakistan. AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

Blasphemy law is repealed in Ireland, enforced in Pakistan – and a problem in many Christian and Muslim countries

There has been outrage over the release of a Christian woman accused of blasphemy in Pakistan. An expert explains how blasphemy laws are hardly obsolete throughout the West.
Florida gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum speaks with health care professionals on Sept. 21, 2018 in Miami. Wilfredo Lee/AP Photo

There’s more to health care access than pre-existing conditions

The campaign trail has been filled with talk about health care coverage, especially pre-existing conditions. While it may sound like both parties are on the same page, their ideas dramatically differ.
Los críticos temen que incluir preguntas sobre la ciudadanía impida que las personas respondan a los censistas en el 2020. U.S. Census Bureau, CC BY-NC-ND

¿Eres ciudadano? El gobierno de Trump quiere saber

Más de dos docenas de estados y ciudades en Estados Unidos demandan al gobierno por el plan de preguntar sobre la ciudadanía en el censo nacional.
A nurse in Uganda uses a stethoscope to listen for heart problems at a screening and educational event Oct. 31, 2017. Tao Farren-Hefer

Women with heart disease in sub-Saharan Africa face challenges, but stigma may be worst of all

Noncommunicable diseases are a growing problem in Africa. Among women, heart disease is a particular concern. Medication to treat it can interfere with pregnancy, making women undesirable partners.
Member of the Coalition of Catholics and Survivors hold a protesting outside the Boston archbishop’s residence in 2003. Jim Bourg/Reuters

The Catholic Church’s grim history of ignoring priestly pedophilia – and silencing would-be whistleblowers

While the problem of priestly abuse might be centuries old, its modern paper trail began after World War II, when 'treatment centers' appeared for rehabilitating priests. Many were send to New Mexico.
Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg paying a courtesy call on Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, D-N.Y., left, and Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del., in June 1993, before her confirmation hearing for the Supreme Court. AP/Marcy Nighswander

Ruth Bader Ginsburg helped shape the modern era of women’s rights – before she went on the Supreme Court

Before she became a Supreme Court justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s work as an attorney in the 1970s fundamentally changed the court’s approach to women's rights and how we think about women – and men.
About 12.7 percent of Americans lived below the poverty line in 2016. StanislauV/shutterstock.com

Why the war on poverty in the US isn’t over, in 4 charts

A White House Council concluded that the war on poverty is "largely over." But, while poverty among seniors has declined, poverty among adults and children as changed little over the last 40 years.
El presidente del Gobierno, Pedro Sánchez, con las ministras y ministros de su gabinete. 06/07/2018. La Moncloa / Fernando Calvo

El Gobierno de España encarna el ascenso global de las mujeres al poder

Una vez que las mujeres acceden a los cargos políticos más altos, su número continúa creciendo, según muestra un nuevo estudio. La vuelta atrás resulta irreversible. Crean un "suelo de cemento" sobre el que se construyen los futuros gobiernos.

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