Case Western Reserve University

Case Western Reserve was originally founded in 1826. What began as two separate institutions — Case Institute of Technology and Western Reserve College — federated in 1967 to form Case Western Reserve University, which immediately became one of the country’s leading research institutions.

Case Western Reserve supports about 100 designated academic and research centers. The eight schools and college offer close to 200 top-ranked undergraduate, graduate and professional programs that range from arts, law and humanities to engineering and medicine.

Case Western Reserve counts 15 Nobel laureates (including the first American scientist to receive the prize) among our current and former faculty and alumni.

About 10,000 students — 40 percent undergraduate — are enrolled at the university, representing all 50 states and more than 100 countries.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 46 articles

An electroconvulsive therapy machine is seen at an exhibition at the Wellcome Collection in London in 2012. REUTERS/Chris Helgren

Electroconvulsive therapy: A history of controversy, but also of help

Critics have portrayed ECT as a form of medical abuse. Yet many psychiatrists, and more importantly, patients, consider it to be safe and effective. Few medical treatments have such disparate images.
'Shredded papers' via www.shutterstock.com

Does nonpartisan journalism have a future?

In a complex media environment, it's become incredibly difficult for the neutral press to point out Donald Trump's lies without having that information discounted as partisan bias.
The Capitol Building as seen in Washington, D.C., Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016. AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

As Republicans ready to dismantle ACA, insurers likely to bolt

Trump's pledge to repeal and replace Obamacare already has weakened the health insurance market and likely will weaken it more. The instability will be costly, in more ways than one.
Benito Mussolini and Adolf Hitler in Munich, Germany. National Archives Collection of Foreign Records Seized, 1675 - 1958

Normalizing fascists

In the 1920s and early 1930s, American journalists tended to put the ascendant fascists on a normal footing.
About one in four people regrets having tattoos. From www.shuttertock.com

Tattoo regret: Can you make it go away?

Tattoos often seem like a good idea in the moment, but tattoo regret is common. There is good reason, not the least of which is infection.
Accepting grief is important for moving toward hope. Shanon Wise

Why there is no healing without grief

After Donald Trump's victory, a scholar says the biblical prophets can help show us the way forward: Just as there is no peace without justice, there is no healing without grief.
President Obama greets a crowd in Milwaukee in March to promote his signature health care law. Jonathan Ernst/REUTERS

What’s ailing the ACA: Insurers or Congress?

Aetna's cutback in the ACA marketplace has raised concerns about the health of the health care law. Here's why stories of its demise may be greatly exaggerated.

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