Case Western Reserve University

Case Western Reserve was originally founded in 1826. What began as two separate institutions — Case Institute of Technology and Western Reserve College — federated in 1967 to form Case Western Reserve University, which immediately became one of the country’s leading research institutions.

Case Western Reserve supports about 100 designated academic and research centers. The eight schools and college offer close to 200 top-ranked undergraduate, graduate and professional programs that range from arts, law and humanities to engineering and medicine.

Case Western Reserve counts 15 Nobel laureates (including the first American scientist to receive the prize) among our current and former faculty and alumni.

About 10,000 students — 40 percent undergraduate — are enrolled at the university, representing all 50 states and more than 100 countries.


Displaying 1 - 20 of 34 articles

President Obama greets a crowd in Milwaukee in March to promote his signature health care law. Jonathan Ernst/REUTERS

What’s ailing the ACA: Insurers or Congress?

Aetna's cutback in the ACA marketplace has raised concerns about the health of the health care law. Here's why stories of its demise may be greatly exaggerated.
Heptathlete Katarina Johnson-Thompson. REUTERS/John Silber

Does practice make an Olympian? Not by itself

We've all heard that practice makes perfect, but that isn't always true. Genetics, cognitive abilities and other traits influence athletic ability.
Trump picks Indiana Governor Mike Pence as vice president. REUTERS/John Sommers II

Mike Pence is the anti-Trump

Trump's choice of the Indiana governor is a love letter to the Republican base.
Father and son before the Muslim funeral prayer for Muhammad Ali in Louisville, Kentucky. Adrees Latif/Reuters

American Islam: a view from the suburbs

Islam is often presented as an unchanging monolith. But as the emergence of 'third spaces' outside home and mosque shows, the American Muslim community exemplifies the diversity of American society.
Prince performs during the 2013 Billboard Music Awards at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. Steve Marcus/Reuters

Are pop stars destined to die young?

For those on Rolling Stone's list of 100 Greatest Artists, their life expectancy is on par with the people of Chad, the nation with the lowest life expectancy in the world.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton fields questions from reporters in Dover, New Hampshire. Brian Snyder/Reuters

When covering elections, journalists face a debilitating dilemma

A partisan media landscape has made it almost impossible for journalists to avoid charges of bias when calling out a candidate's dishonesty.
Remembering ISIS victims at the U.N., November 2015. Lucas Jackson/Reuters

ISIS has changed international law

The urgent need to respond to ISIS has redefined the use of "self-defense" to include attacking a nonstate threat in another country. But what are the implications of this? change?
Michael Vadon and Gage/Skidmore

Are ‘extremist’ candidates electable?

Political science has held that being moderate gets a candidate votes in the presidential election. So how then do Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump fit in?

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