SOAS, University of London

“SOAS University of London is the only higher education institution in Europe specialising in the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. It is a global academic base with the highest concentration of experts focusing on these regions in Europe.

Our scholars grapple with pressing issues – from democracy, development, human rights and identity to legal systems, poverty, religion and social change. Crucially, our experts critique the world from the perspective of our regions to provide in-depth and informed analysis on some of the most challenging issues in our time.

SOAS is also a guardian of specialised knowledge in languages and regions not available anywhere else in the UK. The SOAS Library is one of the most important resources for the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East as well as our Archives and Special Collections which document British interaction with Africa and Asia over the last 250 years.

In a world where globalisation works to shrinks borders, but where nationalism, difference and regionalism also present themselves acutely, SOAS is distinctively positioned to analyse, understand and explain.”

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Displaying 81 - 100 of 173 articles

Un Coran datant de 1284, exposé au Musée d'art islamique de Doha (Qatar). Fadi Al-Assaad/Reuters

Daech ou la théologie musulmane dévoyée

En faisant fi du pluralisme théologique et de la tolérance religieuse, Daech met son interprétation des écritures et de la tradition au service de ses objectifs politiques, et non l’inverse.
The century since the first world war is littered with the broken promises of Muslim rulers to bring about a transition to more representative forms of government. AAP/Asmaa Abdelatif

How the political crises of the modern Muslim world created the climate for Islamic State

The rise of Islamic State and its declaration of the caliphate can be read as part of a wider story that has unfolded since the formation of modern nation states in the Muslim world.
Nate Parker, director of the recent revolutionary US film “Birth of a Nation”. Shutterstock

How to get the African films we all should see onto our screens

Racism is a charge that could be leveled at cinema from its very inception. There are some positive signs of change, but audiences have a role to play in making sure African films flourish.
Reuters/Pascal Rossignol

2015: the year in elections

For better or for worse, various countries around the world charted a new course last year. What lies ahead for 2016?
The Nairobi-Thika highway is being built by China Wuyi, Sinohydro and Shengeli Engineering Construction, and is funded by Kenya, China and the African Development Bank. Reuters/Thomas Mukoya

Chinese investment: why the buck stops with African governments

China offers an alternative to traditional donors and investors in low- and middle-income countries. Adding to its appeal is its focus on infrastructure projects.
Workers in a bank watch as Occupy Wall Street protesters march in New York as part of the populist movement protesting economic inequality. Reuters/Joshua Lott

Why inequality matters – for the rich and the poor

The Marikana tragedy has indicated the violent nature of the struggles over resources and income shares. Inequality must be fought because it perpetuates social injustice.
Run down. Reuters/Philimon Bulawayo

Decline and decay: a sobering trip through southern Africa

I spent most of August 2015 in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Zambia – a depressing and mournful tour indeed. The place I stayed in South Africa, on the outskirts of Johannesburg, is atypical. I am almost…

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