University of Kansas

Since its founding, the University of Kansas has embodied the aspirations and determination of the abolitionists who settled on the curve of the Kaw River in August 1854. Their first goal was to ensure that the new Kansas Territory entered the union as a free state. Another was to establish a university.

Nearly 150 years later, KU has become a major public research and teaching institution of 28,000 students and 2,600 faculty on five campuses (Lawrence, Kansas City, Overland Park, Wichita, and Salina). Its diverse elements are united by their mission to educate leaders, build healthy communities, and make discoveries that change the world.

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Women protest against child marriage in Albany, New York. AP Photo/Anna Gronewold

Child marriage is still legal in the US

It is possible for minors in all 50 states to get married. A scholar explains the long history of child marriage, mostly of young girls, in the US.
Do the rules of success apply equally to all women? Nick Lehr/The Conversation via Wikimedia Commons

Ivanka Trump’s deeply political tome

'Women Who Work' attempts to present itself as an apolitical work. But no narratives ever are – and it's especially the case for those that anxiously seek to appear that way.
Portrait of Fyodor Dostoyevsky, by Vasily Perov (1872). Vasily Perov/Wikimedia Commons

How Dostoevsky predicted Trump’s America

When penning his novel 'Demons,' Fyodor Dostoevsky was influenced by political turmoil in Russia. But his impulsive, crass antagonist bears a striking similarity to the GOP's candidate for president.
A protester outside the Republican convention in Cleveland. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart

What anti-Trump activists can learn from Chicago ‘68

RNC protests in Cleveland have been peaceful, but are they effective? A historian explains what happened at the DNC in 1968 and why activists may want to reconsider their tactics.

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