University of Pennsylvania

The University of Pennsylvania dates its founding to 1740, when a prominent evangelist, George Whitefield, and others established an educational trust fund and began construction of a large school building at Fourth and Arch streets in Philadelphia.

More than 250 years after its founding, the University of Pennsylvania continues to achieve excellence in research and education. Among its many more recent “firsts,” Penn developed ENIAC, the world’s first electronic, large-scale, general-purpose digital computer.

The University of Pennsylvania remains an eminent, world-class institution for the creation and dissemination of knowledge, serving as a model for colleges and universities throughout the world.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 56 articles

Vaccinations have saved countless lives and untold suffering, even though many adults still believe vaccines are bad for their children. Africa Studios/Shutterstock.com

Why vaccine opponents think they know more than medical experts

Vaccines have long been considered safe, but many people still believe they are not. A new study shows that people who think they know more than medical experts are more likely to believe that vaccine are not safe.
Students have been protesting conditions at Howard University for several days. en.wikipedia.org

Howard University student protest: 3 questions answered

As the student protest over conditions at Howard University continues, a scholar weighs in on what the fallout means for historically black colleges and universities.
James Stewart and Donna Reed in ‘It’s a Wonderful Life.’ Wikimedia Commons

The holiday-suicide myth and the intractability of popular falsehoods

Just as facts are stubborn, myths in the era of social media are also proving to be as well. And, that can be harmful, particularly when it comes to the media reporting on holiday suicides. Here's why.
Researchers are taking a close look at “college promise” programs to see if they actually help more students obtain a college education. Calvste / Shutterstock.com

Can college ‘promise’ programs deliver?

As more "college promise" programs are set up in the United States, researchers will be watching to see which ones do the best job at helping students realize their college dreams.
Laurene Powell Jobs, founder and chair of the Emerson Collective. Gus Ruelas/Reuters

The slippery slope of the oligarchy media model

There are some benefits to the uptick in billionaire newspaper and magazine owners, who can weather short-term losses for the sake of long-term gains. But whose interests are really being served?
Kansir/flickr

The mall isn’t dead – it’s just changing

The mall's inventor, Victor Gruen, envisioned thriving hubs of civic activity, rather than bland, asphalt-enclosed shopping centers. Is his original vision now being realized – or further corrupted?
As journalism loses its financial footing, it may need more support from foundations. Tim Karr/Free Press

Can charity save journalism from market failure?

Big cash infusions can give nonprofit journalism a much-needed boost. But the ailing news industry needs more consistent funding.
Will Bill Nye’s new show find a wider audience than Neil deGrasse Tyson’s ‘Cosmos’ did? Vince Bucci/Invision for the Television Academy/AP Images

Can Bill Nye – or any other science show – really save the world?

Popular programming that focuses on science tends to not actually be all that popular. Bringing in new audiences who aren't already up to speed on science topics is a challenge.
In the mid-1990s, body modification enthusiasts – a long-ostracized subculture – created an online community that incorporated blogs, dating and wikis. philippe leroyer/flickr

How Facebook – the Wal-Mart of the internet – dismantled online subcultures

Even though Facebook claims to be a global community, its rise has come at the expense of online subcultures for marginalized people, from body modification enthusiasts to drag queens.

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