University of Southern California – Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences

USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences is the heart of the University of Southern California. The largest, oldest and most diverse of USC’s 19 schools, USC Dornsife is composed of more than 30 departments and dozens of research centers and institutes. USC Dornsife is home to approximately 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and more than 750 faculty members with expertise across a spectrum of academic fields.

Our frontline scholars are working to find solutions to society’s toughest challenges by advancing human health, preserving and improving our environment, and strengthening our communities. Together, we are defining scholarship of consequence for the 21st century.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 79 articles

Presidents Thomas Jefferson and Donald Trump. Wikipedia for Jefferson official portrait/REUTERS/Leah Millis for Trump photo

What Thomas Jefferson, Donald Trump and the American people think about freedom of the press

Americans are overwhelmingly committed to a free press and hostile to government restrictions, a new poll finds. But the country is divided on the meaning of President Trump's attacks on the press.
Levantarle el ánimo a otra persona pudiera ser también un gran estímulo para ti. Mohamed Nohassi/Unsplash, CC BY

¿Cómo apoyar a un hijo con depresión? Enséñale a ayudar a otros

Estudios psicológicos demuestran que el hecho de ayudar a otros nos hace sentir mejor. El hallazgo puede tener una importancia especial para los adolescentes deprimidos.
U.S. President Donald Trump during a campaign rally in Topeka, Kan., Oct. 6, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

From Caesar to Trump: Immunity is a hard thing to give up

US law says the president can't be indicted, an echo of ancient Roman law. The efforts Roman leader Julius Caesar made to maintain his immunity is a cautionary tale for America's political system.
Estatua de Cristóbal Colón en Columbus Circle, Nueva York. Shutterstock / Zoltan Tarlacz

Colón creía que en el Nuevo Mundo encontraría blemios y esciápodos en vez de personas

El viaje de Colón en 1492 fue realmente un viaje hacia lo desconocido. Siglos de historias legendarias le habían hecho creer que en las Indias le esperaban bestias extrañas y hombres monstruosos.
The statue of Christopher Columbus in Columbus Circle, New York City. Zoltan Tarlacz/Shutterstock.com

Columbus believed he would find ‘blemmyes’ and ‘sciapods’ – not people – in the New World

Christopher Columbus' 1492 voyage was really a journey into the unknown. Centuries of conventional wisdom had conditioned him to believe that bizarre beasts and 'monstrous men' would be awaiting him.
Boosting someone else may deliver a mood boost to you too. Mohamed Nohassi/Unsplash

Teens who feel down may benefit from picking others up

Psychology researchers found that daily acts of kindness were linked to increases in positive mood – especially for teens who felt depressed.
Warhead-containing nose cone of an inert Minuteman 3 missile. AP Photo/Charlie Riede

The US nuclear arsenal: A quick overview

As the US talks up denuclearizing North Korea, a former defense department official takes a look at the status of America's stockpile of nuclear weapons.
Violence in communities may have an additional unseen victim: young peoples’ developing brains. Zoran Karapancev/Shutterstock.com

Living with neighborhood violence may shape teens’ brains

Experiencing and witnessing violence in their communities can lead to emotional, social and cognitive problems for kids. A new study shows it affects how their developing brains grow, as well.
A North Korean newscaster reports on the Inter-Korean summit during an April 28 broadcast. Korean Central Television

Are North Korean media outlets signaling that the regime is getting serious about diplomacy?

The reclusive country’s media is tightly controlled and choreographed. But a close look at the tone and focus of the coverage can shed light on the regime’s priorities and resolve.
Saint Patrick. Thad Zajdowicz

10 things to know about the real St. Patrick

There are many myths associated with St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland. But Patrick's own writings and early biographies reveal the person behind the legend.
Moviegoers familiarize themselves with the joystick that will allow them to interact with the film ‘I’m Your Man’ during its premiere on Dec. 16, 1992. AP Photo/Richard Harbus

From Smell-O-Vision to Astrocolor, the film industry’s biggest innovation flops

Sound, color and special effects transformed the moviegoing experience. These inventions decidedly did not.
California’s 1994 fight over immigration parallels the present-day U.S. AP Photo/Nick Ut

When the next generation looks racially different from the last, political tensions rise

In the 1990s, older Californians struggled to make way for a younger, more diverse generation. Here’s how that 'racial generation gap’ transformed the state – and what it means for the rest of the US.
Relics of St. Valentine of Terni at the basilica of Saint Mary in Cosmedin. Dnalor 01 (Own work)

The ‘real’ St. Valentine was no patron of love

Valentine's Day originated as a feast to celebrate the decapitation of a third-century Christian martyr, or perhaps two. So how did the day become a celebration of love?

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