Articles on Gerrymandering

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The Supreme Court is on summer vacation, but because of John Roberts, they may have to come back. AP/J. Scott Applewhite

Roberts rules: The 2 most important Supreme Court decisions this year were about fair elections and the chief justice

Conflict made its way to the Supreme Court this past session with two cases – one about the census, the other about gerrymandering. A court scholar says the two cases are intimately connected.
The Supreme Court is empty days before the justices vote to on the U.S. gerrymandering case. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

After Supreme Court decision, gerrymandering fix is up to voters

The Supreme Court has issued what's likely to be its final word on partisan gerrymandering, saying it's a political issue, not a legal one. That means reform lies in the hands of voters.
Activists at the Supreme Court opposed to partisan gerrymandering hold up representations of congressional districts from North Carolina, left, and Maryland, right. AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

Want to fix gerrymandering? Then the Supreme Court needs to listen to mathematicians

Supreme Court justices have previously called statistical methods of measuring partisan gerrymandering 'sociological gobbledygook' and 'a bunch of baloney.'
Democrat Beto O'Rourke won 63 percent of Latino voters in Texas, exit polls show, and Latinos seem to have voted in record numbers. But it wasn’t enough to win. AP Photo/Eric Gay

Latinos can be an electoral force in 2020

Record high Latino participation shows this growing voter segment will turn out for parties and politicians who tackle issues they care about. That's a big lesson for 2020 – and not just for Dems.
Demonstrators with cut-outs of congressional districts in front of the Supreme Court. Reuters/Joshua Roberts

4 reasons gerrymandering is getting worse

One of the main reasons polarization in the US is on the rise – the way congressional seats are drawn to favor parties – isn't going away anytime soon.
Civil rights organizations have sued Georgia’s Republican secretary of state for failing to register 53,000 new voters, most of them black. Reuters/Christopher Aluka Berry

Georgia election fight shows that black voter suppression, a southern tradition, still flourishes

Georgia's secretary of state has stalled voter registrations and accused Democrats of hacking. His tactics recall past efforts in the South to suppress black votes, from poll taxes to literacy tests
Ontario Premier Doug Ford makes an announcement at Queen’s Park on Friday, July 27, 2018 about significantly reducing the number of Toronto city councillors just months before the fall municipal election. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov

Fighting Doug Ford’s threat to shrink Toronto city council

Doug Ford is invoking the province's broad powers over municipalities in a manner that tramples on fundamental principles of fairness, reasonable notice and the right to effective representation.
Gin Lane, a scene of urban desolation with gin-crazed Londoners; a woman lets her child fall to its death and an emaciated ballad-seller. William Hogarth

America looks hopeless – a lot like the ‘mother country’ once did

When the U.S. broke away from the "mother country," the dream was to let the common good overruled selfish and private interests. Yet the federal government is arranged so this can never occur.
Supporters of Malaysia’s opposition coalition party hold party flags in northern Malaysia on the eve of the country’s recent election. Corruption-plagued Najib Razak was voted out while Mahathir Mohamad won. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

How Malaysian voters defied the odds and ousted corruption

Malaysian voters tossed the corrupt Najib Razak out of office despite efforts by his party to sway the result. A former dictator is back in charge, about to free his onetime political foe from jail.

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