Menu Close

Articles on Franklin D. Roosevelt

Displaying all articles

A crowd greets Sen. John F. Kennedy at Logan Airport in Boston on July 17, 1960, after he became the Democratic nominee for president. John M. Hurley/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Presidential campaigns take flight in the age of the coronavirus

Though air travel has boosted presidential campaigns for decades, the 2020 pandemic has underlined the importance of aircraft as the quickest and safest way to campaign.
Delegates after Donald Trump accepted the GOP presidential nomination at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio on Thursday, July 21, 2016. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/via Getty

Political conventions today are for partying and pageantry, not picking nominees

Political conventions used to pick presidential nominees in private. Now the public picks the nominee and then the party has a big party at the convention, writes a scholar of US elections.
Franklin Roosevelt and other administration officials visit a Civilian Conservation Corps Camp during the New Deal. Library of Congress/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images

To achieve a new New Deal, Democrats must learn from the old one

Similarities between the 1930s and today are hard to ignore, but Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal teaches us that several developments have to coincide to generate a lasting social safety net.
The Capital One Arena, home of the Washington Capitals, sits empty. AP Photo/Nick Wass

A world without sports

This isn't the first time sports have been put on hold. But in the past, the reprieve was brief, and sports went on to act as a way to bring Americans together. This time's different.
An emergency polio ward in Boston in 1955 equipped with iron lungs. These pressurized respirators acted as breathing muscles for polio victims, often children, who were paralyzed. www.apimages.com

The deadly polio epidemic and why it matters for coronavirus

Polio was nearly eradicated with the Salk vaccine in 1955. At the time, little was known about this mysterious disease that paralyzed and sometimes killed young children.
Senator Huey Long at the Capitol in 1935. Everett Historical/Shutterstock.com

The secret origins of presidential polling

The very first scientific horse race poll, which took place 85 years ago, was shrouded in secrecy and may have changed history – even though it was faulty.

Top contributors

More