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Articles on Drought

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Workers race to repair a damaged water main in Calgary on Friday, June 7, 2024. Calgarians are being urged to keep reducing their water usage by 25 per cent as a result of the shortages this break caused. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh)

Calgary water shortages: Key ways to reduce your water footprint

Calgarians have been asked to reduce their water use. These simple steps can help us all to reduce our water footprint and save money at the same time.
A vendor prepares his umbrella as hot days continue in Manila, Philippines in April 2024. Sizzling heat across Asia and the Middle East will worsen because of human-caused climate change. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

Climate change is a human rights issue

Climate change poses clear risks to human rights around the world. It is essential that people hold governments and decision-makers to account.
Farm workers in South Africa will face difficulty working through heatwaves if global warming continues. Klaus Vedfeldt/Getty Images

Climate change makes life harder: in South Africa it’s likely to bring heatwaves, water stress and gender-based violence

The University of Cape Town’s new report on the impacts of climate change in South Africa found that heatwaves and water stress will affect jobs, deepen inequality, and increase gender-based violence.
Workers attempt to repair a water main break in Jackson, Miss. Joshua Lott/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The South’s aging water infrastructure is getting pounded by climate change – fixing it is also a struggle

Extreme downpours and droughts, both fueled by rising global temperatures, are taking a toll. Communities trying to manage the threats face three big challenges.
El Niño droughts such as this one in southern Malawi are becoming regular features in southern Africa. Guido Dingemans/Die Eindredactie/Getty Images

El Niño disasters: governments know what’s coming, but are unprepared – what must change

Governments in southern Africa don’t invest enough in weather forecasting and fail to work together to prepare for natural disasters, leaving the most vulnerable exposed to successive droughts.
Highway 4 crosses Lake Diefenbaker at Saskatchewan Landing Provincial Park. Lake Diefenbaker is a part of the South Saskatchewan river basin which faces unprecedented levels of reduced water flows in 2024. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Michael Bell

Water woes in southern Alberta could spell disaster for aquatic ecosystems, and the people who rely on them

Declining precipitation, climate change and governance failures will drive water flow scarcity in 2024 with serious implications across Western Canada.
Road collapse in northern Kenya due to flash floods on 22 November 2023. Photo by Luis Tato/AFP via Getty Images

East Africa must prepare for more extreme rainfall during the short rainy season – new study

Projections show that there’ll be Indian Ocean dipoles in the future – and that means more rainy days, and more extreme rainfall.
New Africa / Shutterstock

Would you drink recycled water?

Recycled waste water is perfectly safe to drink, but many people aren’t keen to use it for anything other than watering plants.
The 2016 El Niño drought in Malawi dried out maize fields, leaving only weeds. It caused a famine that left over 60 million people in Southern Africa dependent on food aid. Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images

El Niño: Malawi’s harvest of its staple food maize may fall by 22.5% this year

Food security experts recommend that rural farmers in Malawi be given access to irrigation systems to free them from reliance on rain, and find ways outside farming to earn an income.

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