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Articles on Racial wealth gap

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Schools in predominantly Black communities receive less funding, even though Black homeowners pay higher tax rates. Carl Iwasaki/Getty Images

How reparations can be paid through school finance reform

A school finance expert and an education law scholar make the case for why reparations should be paid to African Americans by changing the way schools are funded.
President Lyndon Johnson signing the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which aimed to do away with racial discrimination in the law. But discrimination persisted. AP file photo

Critical race theory: What it is and what it isn’t

A scholar of race and racism explains what critical race theory is – and how many people get it wrong.
Real estate prices are still related to a neighborhood’s racial composition, despite laws prohibiting the explicit consideration of race in appraisals. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Homes in Black and Latino neighborhoods still undervalued 50 years after US banned using race in real estate appraisals

New research shows homes in white areas have appreciated $200,000 more since 1980 than similar homes in nonwhite areas – a result of both old racist housing policies and modern real estate practices.
Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris are among the 2020 presidential hopefuls in favor of reparations. AP Photo/David J. Phillip

Reparations are essential to eliminating the substantial wealth gap between black and white Americans

Several presidential hopefuls have offered proposals to close the racial wealth gap, from baby bonds to reparations. A simulation suggests policies short of direct aid to blacks won’t do the trick.
A racial wealth gap is persisting after centuries enslavement and systemic discrimination. Hyejin Kang/Shutterstock.com

The case for African American reparations, explained

Thanks to demographic and political changes, Democratic contenders are addressing this issue for the first time.

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