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Concussion doesn’t just happen in sports or only in teens and young adults; it affects people of all ages and backgrounds. (Shutterstock)

Concussion is more than sports injuries: Who’s at risk and how Canadian researchers are seeking better diagnostics and treatments

Canadian researchers are exploring unanswered questions about concussion: How to diagnose it accurately and quickly, how to predict outcomes and promote recovery, and how to prevent it altogether.
When asked to recall the popular children’s book series ‘The Berenstain Bears,’ many people make the same error by spelling it ‘The Berenstein Bears.’ Stephen Osman/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

New study seeks to explain the ‘Mandela Effect’ – the bizarre phenomenon of shared false memories

People are puzzled when they learn they share the same false memories with others. That’s partly because they assume that what they remember and forget ought to be based only on personal experience.
Creating a safe space for patients to ask questions and provide fully informed consent could help increase clinical trial recruitment. FatCamera/E+ via Getty Images

Yes, Black patients do want to help with medical research – here are ways to overcome the barriers that keep clinical trials from recruiting diverse populations

Overcoming the access barriers and biases that underrepresented and underserved communities face could not only improve research participation but also improve care.
Rhesus macaques experience an aging process similar to people’s. Goddard Photography/E+ via Getty Images

Expanding Alzheimer’s research with primates could overcome the problem with treatments that show promise in mice but don’t help humans

Nonhuman primates like rhesus monkeys share certain characteristics with people that may make them better study subjects than mice for research on neurodegenerative diseases.
International scientific collaboration has boomed since the end of the 20th century. Yuichiro Chino/Moment via Getty Images

It’s getting harder for scientists to collaborate across borders – that’s bad when the world faces global problems like pandemics and climate change

Scientific research done through international collaboration has boomed in the past 30 years. But recently, powerful countries are using science as a tool of politics, threatening that work.
Heroic actions are often intuitive – even impulsive – rather than a product of thoughtful deliberation. MHU/Getty Images

What makes people willing to risk their lives to save others?

Study after study has shown that men tend to be more willing to put themselves in harm’s way to help others. Why some men rise to the occasion – and others don’t – has been a bit trickier to pin down.

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