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Articles on Sea Turtles

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Kemp’s ridley sea turtles are an endangered species that live and nest in the Gulf of Mexico. National Park Service/WikimediaCommons

Scientists at work: Helping endangered sea turtles, one emergency surgery at a time

For the endangered Kemp’s ridley sea turtle, every individual matters. A team of veterinarians and biologists has formed a network along the Gulf Coast to save injured sea turtles and the species.
Scientists are raising Miami blue butterflies in captivity and reintroducing them in south Florida. Jeff Gage/Florida Museum of Natural History

Live cargo: How scientists pack butterflies, frogs and sea turtles for safe travels

How do you pack butterflies for shipping, or frogs for an overland hike to a new habitat? Three scientists explain how they keep threatened species safe on the road and in the air.
Plastic bags, balloons, and rope fragments were among more than 100 pieces of plastic in the gut of a single turtle. Qamar Schuyler

How much plastic does it take to kill a turtle? Typically just 14 pieces

Autopsies of 1,000 turtles washed up on Australian beaches paint a grim picture of the impact of plastic debris. Even a single piece can be deadly, and on average 14 pieces equals a 50% fatality rate.
Green sea turtle eating seagrass off Lizard Island. Abbi Scott

Dugong and sea turtle poo sheds new light on the Great Barrier Reef’s seagrass meadows

New research highlights the role of sea turtles and dugong in the dispersal of seeds and maintenance of seagrass meadows, an important marine habitat and the primary food source for both animals.
If frogs can glow in the dark and cockroaches can change history, why couldn’t dog-birds exist? Chris Goldberg / flickr

Global series: Wild world

A collection of The Conversation Global’s best articles on animals, from glow-in-the-dark frogs to the wood beetles that do humanity’s dirty work.
Sea turtles have been around for 150 million years, but today’s pace of climate change represents an existential challenge. Regis Duvignau/Reuters

Saving Mexico’s endangered sea turtles will be good for tourism too

Climate change and tourism development in Mexico are altering the country’s shoreline, endangering the habitat of sea turtles. But tourists prefer pristine, natural beaches, too.
A study has shown that turtle hatchlings lend each other a flipper digging out of the sand to save energy. Banco de Imagem Projeto Tamar/Flickr

Turtle hatchlings lend each other a flipper to save energy

New research suggests turtle hatchlings work together with clutch mates to escape their underground nests.
A green turtle hatches in the lab. David Pike

Rising seas could drown turtle eggs: new research

Immersion in seawater kills sea turtle eggs, suggesting that sea turtles are increasingly at risk from rising seas, according to research published today in Royal Society Open Science.

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