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Articles on Welsh language

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Street sign for Fford Pen Llech, said to be the world’s steepest street, with text in English and in Welsh. Approximately 20% of Wales residents are fluent in Welsh, and the goverment is striving to increase that percentage.“ Wikimedia

Protecting endangered languages feels right, but does it really help people?

Media accounts on endangered languages abound, but they don’t always explore how to materially help native speakers. Peer-reviewed research shows that such efforts don’t always have positive effects.
The Welsh name Yr Wyddfa is now used for the mountain instead of Snowdon by the national park authority. Malgosia Janicka/Shutterstock.

Welsh place names are being erased – and so are the stories they tell

Welsh place names often reflect local legends, fauna and topography. The coining of English names to replace them has sparked an ongoing campaign to protect them.
Being bilingual can delay onset of dementia, but sometimes patients revert to their mother tongue, leaving them isolated. Shutterstock

Bilingualism and dementia: how some patients lose their second language and rediscover their first

Why the lives of bilingual dementia patients can be transformed by finding carers who speak their native language.

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