Articles on Bias

Displaying 1 - 20 of 61 articles

Flavour, a popular Nigerian musician, can wear his dreadlocks in peace because they are seen as a temporary fashion statement. Elizabeth Farida/Wikimedia Commons

In Nigeria, dreadlocks are entangled with beliefs about danger

Nigerian men who wear their hair in knots are not a new phenomenon, but the hairstyle's spiritual heritage sparks fear in the hearts of many.
Library subjects and call numbers can be the subject of controversy. jakkaje808/shutterstock.com

The bias hiding in your library

The way books are sorted at the library can be highly political, touching upon issues of race and identity.
Research shows we all hold negative stereotypes; once we accept this, we can start to making positive change. Shutterstock

Let’s stop blaming ourselves for stigmatizing mental health

Awareness campaigns can only go so far to stopping the stigmatization of mental health. Change occurs once we stop shaming ourselves and others for our bias.
It has been a turbulent week for the ABC, with questions still to be answered, particularly by the board. Shutterstock

Grattan on Friday: ABC’s challenge is to ‘keep calm and carry on’

After a dramatic week at the ABC that sees them without a permanent managing director nor a chair, there remain serious questions about government interference and the broadcaster's independence.
When asked, only nine percent of Americans say it’s a bad thing. But could more biases lurk beneath the survey data? Robert Mapplethorpe, 'Ken Moody and Robert Sherman' (1984). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York Gift, The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, 1993.

How do Americans really feel about interracial couples?

More interracial couples are appearing on TV and in advertising. But is media exposure enough to change attitudes?
People who share potential misinformation on Twitter (in purple) rarely get to see corrections or fact-checking (in orange). Shao et al.

Misinformation and biases infect social media, both intentionally and accidentally

Information on social media can be misleading because of biases in three places – the brain, society and algorithms. Scholars are developing ways to identify and display the effects of these biases.
Employees of Starbucks Coffee in the United States and Canada will receive “implicit bias” training. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graeme Roy

Starbucks and the impact of implicit bias training

Starbucks is implementing implicit bias training for its employees in the United States and Canada. Even though we are not aware implicit biases, they lead to discriminatory behaviours.
Should an algorithm try to guess what gender people are by how they look? all_is_magic/Shutterstock.com

Gender is personal – not computational

It can be unpleasant to be mistaken for someone of a different gender. When an algorithm does it secretly, it's even more concerning – especially for transgender and gender-nonconforming people.

Top contributors

More