Articles on Psychology

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Phobias are an intense fear of very specific things like objects, places, situations or animals. Shutterstock

Curious Kids: where do phobias come from?

There are three main scenarios that may influence whether or not you develop a phobia.
School students took to the streets in Melbourne and other Australian cities back in March as part of a global rally on climate change. Now they’re doing it again. AAP Image/Ellen Smith

Ignoring young people’s climate change fears is a recipe for anxiety

Young people have reason to protest today and call for action on climate change. But they risk anxiety if they feel they are not heard and nothing is done.
Conspiracy theories have been popular in the U.S. for decades. Motortion Films/Shutterstock.com

Are conspiracy theories on the rise in the US?

With the rise of internet groups for conspiracy theorists, it may feel like Americans live in a unique time. But conspiracy theories have been common for decades.
Ian West/PA Wire/PA Images

Why do people believe in curses?

From Strictly Come Dancing to the Tour de France 'curses' have rational explanations. Here, psychologists discuss why belief in them persists.
The American Survival Research Foundation offered a reward of $1,000 for cracking one of Thouless’s two codes within three years of his death. It was not claimed. Shutterstock.com

Cryptology from the crypt: how I cracked a 70-year-old coded message from beyond the grave

Computer capabilities have boosted our decryption technology to great heights. How will the future compare to a past, one in which codes were thought to be a means of communicating after death?
Dwelling on the past, like writing in a diary, is part of being human and helps us form our identity. But not all memories are helpful. from www.shutterstock.com

Why do I dwell on the past?

Remembering past events, experiences or emotions is a big part of being human. But if dwelling on the past is distressing, here's what you can do to help.
Winston Churchill, Joseph Stalin and Franklin D Roosevelt at the Yalta Conference, 1945. Wikipedia

Who won the war? We did, says everyone

New research suggests people from Germany, Russia, the UK and US all think their own country was the most important in World War II.
The research doesn’t say what some lawmakers suggest every time there’s a mass shooting. Fredrick Tendong/Unsplash

Stop blaming video games for mass killings

On the whole, results from psychology research studies don't support a direct connection between playing violent video games and aggressive behavior.

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