Articles on Breast Cancer

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The researchers looked at cancer occurrence in those exposed to higher intakes of ultra-processed foods, compared to lower intakes. Shutterstock

Research Check: will eating ‘ultra-processed’ foods give you cancer?

The study showed that every 10% increase in consumption of ultra-processed food was linked to a 12% increase in developing some types of cancers. But it didn't show the processed food caused cancers.
In this Dec. 3, 2014 photo, liver cancer patient Crispin Lopez Serrano talks to an oncology nurse at a hospital in Clackamas, Ore. AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka

How kindness can make a difference in cancer care

Great strides have been made in cancer care over the past decades. As World Cancer Day on Feb. 4 approaches, it's important to note the growing role that kindness and empathy play in good care.
Liquid biopsy is less invasive than standard biopsy, where a needle is put into a solid tumour to confirm a cancer diagnosis. Shutterstock

A new blood test can detect eight different cancers in their early stages

There are currently few effective and non-invasive methods to screen for early stages of cancer. But scientists have now developed a new blood test that promises to detect eight different cancers.
Dr. Karen Lindfors, a professor of radiology and chief of breast imaging at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, examines the mammogram of a patient. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Routine mammograms do save lives: The science

The majority of research suggests the benefits of mammography screening greatly outweigh the harms for women over age 40.
African-American women are about three times more likely to be diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease. mangostock/Shutterstock.com

A new clue into treatments for triple negative breast cancer, a mean disease

Researchers have long been looking for clues into how to treat triple negative breast cancer. Could fighter blood cells that infiltrate the tumor provide insight?
Physical activity has long been considered a way to lower risk for breast cancer. vectorfusionart/Shutterstock.com

How inherited fitness may affect breast cancer risk

Physical activity is considered an important way to lower risk for breast cancer. But what if your ability to be fit is influenced by genes you inherit? Would that raise your risk? In rats, it did.
A recent Canadian trial reports breast cancer over-diagnosis rates of up to 55 per cent, from routine screening mammograms. (Shutterstock)

Routine mammograms do not save lives: The research is clear

October is breast cancer awareness month. Women should know there is no reliable evidence that routine mammograms reduce death from breast cancer, and there's good evidence that they cause harm.
Canadians are overwhelmingly opposed to insurance companies having access to their genetic test results. A new Canadian law prevents insurers from using genetic information to determine coverage or pricing. (Shutterstock)

Why insurers are wrong about Canada’s genetic non-discrimination law

Canadian insurance companies argue that a new law denying them access to genetic test results will raise the cost of insurance for everyone. That's doubtful.
More mammography, for instance, starting at a younger age or screening more often, isn’t necessarily better. from www.shutterstock.com

Three questions to ask about calls to widen breast cancer screening

Calls to routinely offer breast cancer screening to more women might sound like a good idea, but can harm. Here are three questions to ask when figuring out whether more screening really is better.

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