Articles on Genetics

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It’s naive to pretend there are no profound genetic and epigenetic differences between the sexes. Elephant Gun Studios/Flickr

Differences between men and women are more than the sum of their genes

What produces the differences between men and women? Are they trivial or profound? Are they genetic or environmental, or both? And are men really closer genetically to chimpanzees than to women?
Now that we know there’s a gene for intelligence, are we going to start breeding little Einsteins? from www.shutterstock.com.au

The ethics of ‘gifted’ genes: the road to Gattaca?

Recent research out of the UK has identified a genetic “general academic achievement factor”. Does this pave the way for genetically testing babies for intelligence?
Family resemblance isn’t only down to genes, but also to the influence of the environment on those genes. Mitchell Joyce/Flickr

Epigenetics: phenomenon or quackery?

Epigenetics is increasingly used as a buzzword to sell pseudoscientific products, but the truth of epigenetics is even more interesting – and complex – than the quacks claim.
A new technique could help uncover previously unknown genetic factors contributing to susceptibility to TB. Supplied

How mapping ancestral genes could help the fight against TB

Although one third of the world's population have the TB bacterium, the disease only develops in 10%, which may be linked to genetic factors.
Australia’s Federal Court last year rejected Ms D'Arcy’s appeal and ruled companies could patent genes they isolated. Dan Peled/Shutterstock

Remind me again, how can companies patent breast cancer genes?

The High Court challenge is the last resort for Ms D'Arcy's test case against companies patenting human genes and has implications for patients, clinicians and researchers.
Epigenetic molecules play a different melody on different people’s genomes, and this might be contributing to some developing autism. Jesse Kruger/Flickr

Music of the genome hits a discord with autism

The epigenetic 'musicians' that play our genomes in different ways might help us understand the causes of autism.
The discovery of the genes that influence the beak shape in the famous Galapagos finches highlight the underlying unity of all life. Paul Krawczuk/Flickr

Darwin’s finches highlight the unity of all life

Darwin's finches are known to be a paragon of evolution by natural selection, but a recent genetic discovery relating to their beaks highlights the evolutionary connectedness of all life.

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