Articles on Students

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Suspension refers to when a student is sent home from school waiting for a decision about how to respond to a serious incident. Shutterstock

Why suspending or expelling students often does more harm than good

Research shows punishments like suspension and expulsion further disadvantage already vulnerable stdents and could result in long term criminal and anti-social behaviour.
Students from South Plantation High School, carrying placards, protest in support of gun control. Carlos Garcia/Reuters

What the National School Walkout says about schools and free speech

When students walked out of school to protest what they see as lax gun laws, some risked punishment from their schools. But it may be worth it to send a message, a First Amendment scholar argues.
So how will the students rate their professor when the class is over? U.S. Department of Education/Flickr

Student evaluations and hazards in the classroom

In many European universities and specialized schools, professors are now being assessed by their students. While this has long been standard in the United States, many issues can arise.
The tomb of Abelard and Héloise. Alexandre Lenoir, via Wikimedia Commons

What a medieval love saga says about modern-day sexual harassment

An affair between a philosophy professor and his teenage student became the subject of ballads in the streets of Paris in the 12th century. A scholar asks: Why wasn't it called sexual harassment?
Studying can be made easier by removing distractions and spacing study out over a couple months. Shutterstock

Study habits for success: tips for students

It can be hard to get into a study groove, but removing distractions, getting enough sleep, self-testing, spacing out your study and creating memory aids can help students succeed.
For veterans going back to school, student life can involve many stresses. US Department of Education

The emotional challenges of student veterans on campus

Since 2009, nearly one million veterans have benefited from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, which helps them pay for tuition and other expenses. A scholar explains how it's a hard transition.
Madonna with her adopted son, David Banda, at an orphanage, 40 km from the capital Lilongwe April 19, 2007. Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters

Volunteer tourism: what’s wrong with it and how it can be changed

Voluntourists' ability to change systems, alleviate poverty or provide support for vulnerable children is limited. They don't have the skills and can perpetuate patronising and unhelpful ideas.

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