Artikel-artikel mengenai Environmental justice

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Breezy Point, New York off the coast of Long Island after the storm surge from Superstorm Sandy. AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

Storms hit poorer people harder, from Superstorm Sandy to Hurricane Maria

Five years after Superstorm Sandy, we see how disadvantaged social groups suffered more from the storm before and after – much as we're seeing in Hurricanes Harvey and Maria.
Under the El tracks, downtown Chicago. Franck Michel

Urban noise pollution is worst in poor and minority neighborhoods and segregated cities

New research shows that noise pollution in US cities is concentrated in poor and minority communities. Beyond regulating airplane noise, the US has done relatively little to curb noise pollution.
Coal stockpile at a Milwaukee, Wisconsin power plant, 2011. Michael Pereckas

Even when it’s sitting in storage, coal threatens human health

A recent study shows that large piles of coal produce measurable quantities of fine particulate air pollution within a 25-mile radius. Covering coal trains and storage piles could reduce the problem.
Children run through an open fire hydrant to cool off during the kickoff of the 2016 Summer Playstreets Program in the Harlem neighborhood of New York, July, 6, 2016. AP Photo/Ezra Kaplan

Heat waves threaten city dwellers, especially minorities and the poor

Climate change is making heat waves more frequent and intense around the world. Cities are hotter than surrounding areas, so urban dwellers – especially minorities and the poor – are at greatest risk.
Demonstrators at a rally in Frankfort, Kentucky, Feb. 13, 2013, protest against mountaintop removal coal mining. AP Photo/James Crisp

Is a healthy environment a human right? Testing the idea in Appalachia

Are all people entitled to live in a clean and healthy environment? A legal scholar says yes, and argues for using this principle to address damage from polluting industries in Appalachia.
Abandoned industrial buildings at San Francisco’s Pier 70, with a smokestack in the background. Lindsey Dillon

Cleaning up toxic sites shouldn’t clear out the neighbors

Cleaning up and reusing contaminated sites, known as brownfields, can create jobs and promote economic growth. But it also can drive gentrification that prices out low-income residents.
Most U.S. environmental organizations are less diverse than this group of Californian environmental justice leaders. Brooke Anderson/CEJA

Why environmental groups need more volunteers of color

How could green groups attract more diverse volunteers? Maybe they could put more time and energy into outreach toward the people most affected by environmental injustices.
The Flint water crisis was one of the few cases of environment-related social injustices that reached national attention in recent years. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Will we reverse the little progress we’ve made on environmental justice?

Addressing social and health inequalities from pollution is no longer a priority at the EPA. What did the Office of Environmental Justice do and what will happen if it's shut down?
Activists, federal workers and union representatives rallied for environmental protection policies at the EPA. American Federation of Government Employees

In planned EPA cuts, US to lose vital connection to at-risk communities

The EPA served as a conduit between the federal government and at-risk communities. Communications scholars look at how environmental justice issues could be set back in scaled-down EPA.
In December, protesters in Standing Rock, North Dakota scored a big victory against a pipeline builder, yet the underlying problems have not been addressed. AP Photo/David Goldman

Five reasons why the North Dakota pipeline fight will continue in 2017

A Native American scholar explains why so little has changed despite the apparent victory of protesters opposing the North Dakota Access Pipeline protest.
The incoming EPA will likely lean toward less oversight over state public health programs – and lax enforcement is one of the causes behind the Flint water crisis. Rebecca Cook/Reuters

Will a weakened EPA set environmental justice back?

The hostility of Scott Pruitt, Trump's nominee to head the EPA, toward climate change rules is well-known. But his anti-regulatory stance could easily set back years of work on environmental justice.
Stacks at the Nucor Steel plant – one of the types of manufacturing sites that would be affected by a carbon tax – in front of the Space Needle in Seattle. AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Why aren’t environmentalists supporting a carbon tax in Washington state?

Washington state's plan to create a carbon tax would make it a climate leader, but local environmental groups are fighting it. What gives?
Residents of Flint, Michigan wait at a congressional hearing in Washington, D.C. on the water crisis. Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

Clinton seizes on environmental justice but progress requires deep reforms

Hillary Clinton has elevated environmental justice to a high level as a presidential nominee, but as the Flint water crisis demonstrates, the deeper problem lies in ineffective government agencies.
The hidden costs of affordable housing in the outer suburbs include poorer access to services and long hours of commuting. AAP/David Crosling

An environmentally just city works best for all in the end

Australian cities should be made to work for all inhabitants. This involves evenly spreading the disadvantages of industrial and commercial activities as well as the advantages of good access to services.
Flint, Michigan residents couldn’t get answers about their water – so they did their own research. Laura Nawrocik

Can citizen science empower disenfranchised communities?

A new model of citizen-led science is emerging – as in the case of Flint, Michigan's poisoned water. Rather than simply supporting scientists, citizens ask their own questions and set the research agenda.

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