African Population and Health Research Center

APHRC is a leading pan-African research institution headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, that conducts high quality policy-relevant research on population, health, education, urbanization and related development issues across Africa. APHRC actively engages policymakers and other key stakeholders to achieve measurable policy impacts and ensure decision making across the continent is informed by rigorous evidence-based research.

APHRC is also committed to developing the next generation of globally competitive African scholars and leads by example through numerous research capacity strengthening initiatives and strong partnerships with top African universities and research institutions. Over the last decade, APHRC has contributed to a better Africa through quality research, and results-based strategic communications and policy engagement.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 26 articles

Sub-Saharan Africa can achieve meaningful and sustainable change in health by 2030. Shutterstock

Why the path to longer and healthier lives for all Africans is within reach

Sub-Saharan countries have unprecedented opportunities to substantially improve health outcomes within a generation, largely with their own resources.
Household air pollution in Nairobi is primarily driven by fuels burnt for cooking and lighting. EPA/Dai Kurakawa

Invisible and ignored: air pollution inside the homes of Nairobi’s residents

Research in Kenya’s capital found average levels of hazardous solid and liquid particles in the air within households were three times more than the WHO recommended maximum level.
Pupils from Kibera, one of the largest slums in the Kenyan capital Nairobi. Reuters/Noor Khamis

How partnerships enriched the learning for Nairobi slum children

Education outcomes of young people can be improved with targeted interventions. At the centre lies the participation of partners -- community, family and schools.
Just another day in Nairobi’s Kibera slums. Slums are characterised by densely packed settlements with inadequate provision of services. Reuters/Noor Khamis

Slum health is not urban health: why we must distinguish between the two

Despite increased global awareness about poor conditions in slums, the health of their inhabitants is a little studied phenomenon.
Ghanaian cancer specialists examine a patient’s scan. Reuters/Olivier Asselin

Africa needs a fresh approach to ‘lifestyle’ diseases research

So-called lifestyle diseases such as cancer and heart disease have been rising in Africa, adding to the already huge burden of disease in poor countries. But the research has not kept pace.
Four-year-old Stacey Musimbi sits inside a specialised early childhood deaf unit programme in Nairobi. Reuters/Samantha Sais

Are Kenyan children ready for the leap from pre-primary to primary school?

Early childhood education services have proliferated in the public and private sectors. But many children who attend these preschool centres do not receive quality services.
A parent surveys the scene of Kenya’s worst school fire, in which 63 students died in 2001. Recent arson attacks have been aimed at disruption. Reuters

Fighting fire with fire is unlikely to stem Kenya student unrest

A shocking wave of school fires set by students across Kenya has elicited a range of counter-measures, none of which appears to get to the root of the problem.
Embarking on the path to a PhD is a scary business. Shutterstock

Want to do your PhD in Africa? Here’s what you need to know

Many people are left floundering when they try to get working on their PhDs. In Africa, this is often because the skills they need haven't been developed earlier in their academic careers.
Genomic research in Africa will help explain the genetic risk factors of diseases that affect the world’s poorest people. Shutterstock

Why African genomic studies can solve the continent’s health issues

Genomic research must take place in Africa because African populations have evolved significantly and their genetic composition is more diverse than that of populations elsewhere.

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