Grattan Institute

Grattan Institute aspires to contribute to public policy in Australia as a liberal democracy in a globalised economy. Our work is objective, evidence-driven and non-aligned. We foster informed public debate on the key issues for Australia through both public events and private forums engaging key decision makers and the broader community.


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Road user pricing would encourage people to take non-essential trips at a different time, or not at all.

Road user charging belongs on the political agenda as the best answer for congestion management

Charging people to drive has been the dream of policy wonks – serving politicians tend to see it as political poison. So when federal minister Paul Fletcher raises it, that's a step forward.
Labor leader Bill Shorten has shown, with the announcement of the party’s super plan, that he’s willing to cooperate with the government on some measures. Mick Tsikas/AAP

A super test for Australia’s political system

Labor's superannuation plan shows some promise for budget repair, if the two parties can compromise where it counts.
Is it fair that students pay different amounts for university courses? .SilentMode/flickr

Should students pay different fees for university courses?

Students currently pay higher fees for courses that lead to jobs with typically higher wages. But not all students find, or want, a job in their area of study. Should all students then pay the same amount for their university degree?
Education policy should focus on making sure that every student makes great progress, rather than accountability for test scores or teacher performance pay. from

Three schools reforms that will lift student outcomes

Focusing on progress – not just achievement – and investing in improving teaching practice will help to lift slipping standards in Australian schools.
By persuading some drivers to travel a different route or at a different time, congestion charges can dramatically improve the flow of traffic. AAP/Andrew Brownbill

How to make cities work better – here’s what the government needs to do

Bigger cities increase wages, output and innovation, but also problems of congestion and pollution. Congestion charges can minimise these problems by dramatically improving traffic flows.

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