Grattan Institute

Grattan Institute aspires to contribute to public policy in Australia as a liberal democracy in a globalised economy. Our work is objective, evidence-driven and non-aligned. We foster informed public debate on the key issues for Australia through both public events and private forums engaging key decision makers and the broader community. Twitter: @GrattanInst

Links

Displaying 1 - 20 of 431 articles

On one hand, we’re still able to forecast a surplus. On the other, conditions are deteriorating. Treasurer Frydenberg and Finance Minister Cormann deliver the news. Lukas Coch/AAP

5 things MYEFO tells us about the economy and the nation’s finances

MYEFO contains a long-overdue admission: that low wage growth is the new normal. It'll take extraordinary spending restraint to make the surplus forecasts stick.
Unless we know who who Newstart recipients are, we are likely to make wrong decisions about how much to pay them and whether to drug test them. Shutterstock

5 charts on what a Newstart recipient really looks like

A typical Newstart recipient is middle-aged, female, and more likely than most to live outside of a major city.
Prime Minister Scott Morrison (right) and Energy Minister Angus Taylor at Snowy Hydro Scheme. The Grattan Institute says the government should better encourage investment rather than build electricity infrastructure. LUKAS COCH/AAP

Governments took the hard road on clean energy – and consumers are feeling the bumps

Australia's entire coal fleet will retire in the next few decades. The federal government's response to the Hazelwood coal plant closure has left a mess – it must do better.
The avocado latte is indeed a thing, but young Australians are spending less on luxuries than they used to, while older Australians are spending more. Shutterstock

For the first time in a long time, we’re setting up a generation to be worse off than the one before it

A new Grattan Institute study finds that for the first time in a long time, young Australians are no better off than those who came before, and are likely to do worse.
Once qualified, men who did a popular engineering-related VET course often worked in high-paid fields such as construction or manufacturing. from shutterstock.com

If you have a low ATAR, you could earn more doing a VET course than a uni degree – if you’re a man

Students with lower ATARs generally have lower lifetime earnings. But a Grattan Institute report found low ATAR men could earn more doing a VET course than a bachelor degree in their chosen field.

Research and Expert Database

Authors

More Authors