The Ohio State University

Founded in 1870, The Ohio State University is one of the world’s most comprehensive public research universities. Consistently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the nation’s top 20 public universities, Ohio State is a research powerhouse, with a wide-ranging network of expertise on a single campus. The Columbus campus is home to more than 300 collaborative research centers and 15 colleges, including seven in the health sciences and colleges of agriculture and engineering.

The breadth, depth and excellence of our interdisciplinary research programs make Ohio State a leading force of innovation and change – locally, nationally and globally. With nearly a billion dollars in research expenditures annually, the university is a world-class innovator in critical areas such as climate change, cancer, infectious diseases, advanced materials and ag-bio products.

In Ohio, more than 64,000 students, from all 50 states and 110 countries, pursue their personal career aspirations at our five campuses. Ohio State’s Alumni Association is one of the oldest in the nation, with more than 500,000 alumni living around the world. Three Global Gateway campuses—in China, Brazil and India—make Ohio State a truly international university.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 263 articles

Lebanese protesters formed a 105-mile human chain connecting geographically and religiously diverse cities across the country, Oct. 27. 2019. AP Photo/Bilal Hussein

Lebanon uprising unites people across faiths, defying deep sectarian divides

Lebanon's 1989 peace deal ended a civil war by sharing political power between religious factions. That created a society profoundly divided by religion – something today's protesters hope to change.
A pitcher tries to throw a ball past a batter. AP Images/Eric Gay

Curious Kids: How does a curveball curve?

In baseball, a pitcher can throw a ball that seems to curve away just as it crosses the plate. How do they do it? It's all about aerodynamics.
Forty-seven states let computer science count in place of math or science classes required for high school graduation. Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com

Computer science now counts as math credit in most states – is this a good idea?

Most states have changed their rules in recent years to let computer science count as a required high school math or science class. A physics professor explains how that trend could set students back.
Marjory Stoneman Douglas students gather in the Florida state Capitol in Tallahassee Feb. 21, 2018 to confront legislators about stricter gun laws. Gerald Herbert/AP Photo

More mental health care won’t stop the gun epidemic, new study suggests

A new study looks at whether deaths by suicide could be lowered with mental health care. To a small degree, yes. But a look at the costs suggests there may be better ways to prevent shooting deaths.
In a news cycle full of clownish characters and outrageous rhetoric, it’s no wonder satire isn’t fully registering with a lot of readers. The Onion

Too many people think satirical news is real

You might see a headline from The Onion or The Babylon Bee and, for a split second, think it's true. But many social media users don't get the joke – and share these articles as if they're real.
Research is mixed about whether children lose learning during summer break. Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com

5 things parents need to know about ‘summer loss’

While many studies and news articles say children lose academically over the summer break, a researcher says the worries are exaggerated.
Screenshot from ‘Maude’s Dilemma.’ Amazon Prime Video

A concise history of the US abortion debate

Abortion has been a huge political issue in the US for the last 50 years. But the abortion debate is not new. It began at least a century before landmark abortions rights decision Roe v. Wade.
Police officers loyal to the Houthi rebels march during a military parade in Sanaa, Yemen in July 2017. The placards read: ‘Allah is the greatest. Death to America, death to Israel, a curse on the Jews, victory to Islam.’ REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah

Congressional action on Yemen may be the first salvo against presidential war powers

Political fallout from the Vietnam War gave Congress more power to control foreign affairs, but they have been reluctant to use it.

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