The Ohio State University

Founded in 1870, The Ohio State University is one of the world’s most comprehensive public research universities. Consistently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the nation’s top 20 public universities, Ohio State is a research powerhouse, with a wide-ranging network of expertise on a single campus. The Columbus campus is home to more than 300 collaborative research centers and 15 colleges, including seven in the health sciences and colleges of agriculture and engineering.

The breadth, depth and excellence of our interdisciplinary research programs make Ohio State a leading force of innovation and change – locally, nationally and globally. With nearly a billion dollars in research expenditures annually, the university is a world-class innovator in critical areas such as climate change, cancer, infectious diseases, advanced materials and ag-bio products.

In Ohio, more than 64,000 students, from all 50 states and 110 countries, pursue their personal career aspirations at our five campuses. Ohio State’s Alumni Association is one of the oldest in the nation, with more than 500,000 alumni living around the world. Three Global Gateway campuses—in China, Brazil and India—make Ohio State a truly international university.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 184 articles

Most Puerto Ricans are still in the dark, as is the mainland about the recent hurricanes’ economic impact. Reuteres/Alvin Baez

Why Puerto Rico ‘doesn’t count’ to the US government

Although Puerto Ricans are American citizens, what happens on the island tends to stay there, at least in terms of economic data.
Coca-Cola executives Robert C. Goizueta and Donald R. Keough toast cans of ‘New Coke’ – a product rollout that’s considered one of the biggest business blunders of all time. AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler

The best way to deal with failure

According to new research, the way you respond could determine whether or not you'll repeat the same mistake in the future.
Talking about ivory-funded terrorism overlooks the real sources of income for terror groups. Author supplied

Why blaming ivory poaching on Boko Haram isn’t helpful

The idea that terror groups like Boko Haram fund their activities through ivory poaching in Africa is a compelling narrative. But it’s undermining wildlife conservation and human rights.
TVA Kingston Fossil Plant in Tennessee, site of a 1.1 billion gallon spill of coal ash slurry in 2008, photographed on March 28, 2012. Appalachian Voices

Trump’s policies will harm coal-dependent communities instead of helping them

Rural development experts say the best way to help coal communities by is investing in people, infrastructure and a clean environment. Instead, President Trump's budget cuts programs in these areas.
Hurricane Irma descends on the Caribbean islands. NOAA National Weather Service National Hurricane Center/Handout via Reuters

Are catastrophic disasters striking more often?

Saturated media coverage of hurricanes like Harvey and Irma can make it seem like disasters happen all the time. Is the frequency of billion-dollar disasters really rising?
The first Labor Day was hardly a national holiday. Workers had to strike to celebrate it. Frank Leslie's Weekly Illustrated Newspaper's September 16, 1882

Have we forgotten the true meaning of Labor Day?

The holiday began as a strike against excessive workweeks but now bears little resemblance to its worker-centric origins, even as the founders' gains are slowly lost.
Social smoking is just as bad on your heart as regular smoking, a new study suggests. California Department of Health Services

Why social smoking can be just as bad for you as daily smoking

About one in 10 Americans say they sometimes smoke, often in social settings. Many think it's not so bad for them. A new study has some scary findings, when it comes to matters of the heart.

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