The Ohio State University

Founded in 1870, The Ohio State University is one of the world’s most comprehensive public research universities. Consistently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the nation’s top 20 public universities, Ohio State is a research powerhouse, with a wide-ranging network of expertise on a single campus. The Columbus campus is home to more than 300 collaborative research centers and 15 colleges, including seven in the health sciences and colleges of agriculture and engineering.

The breadth, depth and excellence of our interdisciplinary research programs make Ohio State a leading force of innovation and change – locally, nationally and globally. With nearly a billion dollars in research expenditures annually, the university is a world-class innovator in critical areas such as climate change, cancer, infectious diseases, advanced materials and ag-bio products.

In Ohio, more than 64,000 students, from all 50 states and 110 countries, pursue their personal career aspirations at our five campuses. Ohio State’s Alumni Association is one of the oldest in the nation, with more than 500,000 alumni living around the world. Three Global Gateway campuses—in China, Brazil and India—make Ohio State a truly international university.

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Displaying 81 - 100 of 190 articles

‘Feeling great!’ Clinton puts on a brave face for reporters a few hours after leaving a 9/11 commemoration because she felt ‘overheated.’ REUTERS/Brian Snyder

A short history of presidents lying about their health

Avoiding questions about coughs and chronic conditions has a long political history in America.
Russian President Vladimir Putin in center. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov

Why Russians support Putin’s foreign policy

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s approval rating has not dropped below 80 percent since March 2014. Russians overwhelmingly support their president's aggression in Georgia and Crimea. Here's why.
A four-day workweek won’t guarantee you more days like this. www.shutterstock.com

Why a four-day workweek is not good for your health

The idea of a four-day workweek sounds great, and many companies have tested or even implemented it, citing happier, healthier workers. But here's why it may not be healthy.
The scene in Nice the morning after the July 14 terror attack – during which an emergency-warning app failed to give timely notice. Michel Abada

When disaster-response apps fail

The solution to emergency communications: redundancy, redundancy, redundancy.
A throwback to the Clinton White House? Jeff Christensen and Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

A third term for the Clintons?

Hillary Clinton's candidacy has revived an old controversy in a new way: presidential third terms. It is, as one historian explains, a controversy as old as the nation itself.
In the future, will Turkey be a little, or a lot, democratic? Ammar Awad/Reuters

The tragedy of Turkish democracy in five acts

A professor at Ohio State surveyed Turkish citizens about their views on democracy. What he learned helps explain the current crisis in the EU wannabe.
One can’t accurately predict a rampage shooting based on exposure to violent video games or any other single factor. ScreenShots of Call of Duty 4 Modern Warfare/Brother Games screenshot

Violent video games and real violence: there’s a link but it’s not so simple

There is agreement that violent video games lead to aggression. But one can't accurately predict a rampage shooting based on exposure to violent video games or any other single factor.
Upon request, Facebook will remove content for violating local laws. In the last six months of 2014, it restricted access to 3,624 pieces of information in Turkey. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Is internet freedom a tool for democracy or authoritarianism?

The U.S. State Department and the United Nations are spending big bucks to support the internet as a boon for democracy. But new research shows just providing access isn't enough.

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