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University of Notre Dame Australia

The University of Notre Dame Australia was founded through an Act of the Parliament of Western Australia in December 1989. Since its inception, Notre Dame has become a leader in higher education and now boasts over 11,000 students enrolled across its three campuses in Fremantle, Sydney and Broome.

Notre Dame offers a wide range of courses in arts and sciences, business, education, law, medicine, nursing, philosophy and theology. Students receive an excellent standard of training for the professions from leaders in their field within a context of Catholic faith and values.

Notre Dame is rated 5 stars by students and has one of the highest graduate employment rates.*

At Notre Dame, students are part of a vibrant and connected community that respects human life, dignity and social justice.

*85.6% graduates employed on graduation – 9.5% higher than the national average. ~ 2012 Graduate Destination Survey

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Articles (1 - 20 of 69)

Secrecy around investor state dispute settlement clauses in the Transpacific Partnership has stoked concerns. AAP Image/NewZulu/Peter Boyle

Sovereign risk fears around TPP are overblown

The secrecy around negotiations of the Transpacific Partnership have been painted as sinister. But could the reasons be about practicality?
Austen periodically runs afoul of a particular kind of cultural hypocrisy. jamelah e.

Jane Austen is facing death by popularity … and men

Once pivotal to the English canon, Jane Austen has been adapted and readapted for Hollywood and Bollywood – and that kind of popularity comes at a cost.
Rugby union star Karmichael Hunt has been stood down by his club pending a court appearance on drug supply charges. AAP/Dan Peled

Being great at sport does not come with good moral judgement

There is a tension between views of players’ rights under employment contracts and their responsibilities – both ethically and contractually
The politics of space governs the relationships between characters in Robin Campanillo’s Eastern Boys. Palace Films

Review: love in the age of mass migration in Eastern Boys

The camera, situated in the middle of the foyer of a public building, looks through large windows into the street and city beyond. The protagonist couple of Eastern Boys – affluent Frenchman Daniel (Olivier…
The government’s political play on submarines could backfire. Image sourced from Shutterstock.com

Tender doublespeak adds risk to submarine decision

Days after announcing Australia’s largest ever defence contract will be awarded via a “competitive evaluation process”, the government is still scrambling for a sensible definition of what such a process…
The tragedies of ancient Greece underpin Nietzsche’s understanding of what it means to be an artist. Hans Runge/Flickr

Living life as an artist: Nietzsche on creativity

Love or loathe him, philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) offered a unique way of considering creativity in his first major work, The Birth of Tragedy, published in 1872. Competing creative energies…
The stunning vocal performance of the Latvian Radio Choir was one of the highlights of the 2015 Sydney Festival. Sydney Festival

Review: Latvian Radio Choir, a full-throated vocal celebration

Swedish director Kay Pollak’s film As It is in Heaven (2004) climaxes at a point of musical bliss which is both chaotic and profoundly unifying. Rather than singing a few polished songs with energy in…
On the Harmful Effects of Tobacco is a marriage between words and music. Pascal Victor/Sydney Festival

Dissonance and relief: Chekhov at the Sydney Festival

At least four metronomes ticked away at various points on the stage as the audience seated itself for last night’s opening performance of Anton Chekhov’s On The Harmful Effects of Tobacco at the Sydney…
In Wot? No Fish!! Braverman made the theatre into a kind of living room, offering the audience gefilte fish with chrein sauce. Sydney Festival

Every detail counts in Wot? No Fish!! at Sydney Festival

During an artist talk just an hour before performing Wot? No Fish!! on Saturday at the Sydney Festival, English writer/actor Danny Braverman observed that as an artist he seeks “to foreground universals…
Perry Keyes songs about working class life in Sydney’s suburbs aren’t necessarily an easy fit for the festival setting. Photo by Johnny Barker. Sydney Festival

Review: Perry Keyes' Tales of Sydney’s Western Suburbs

Whenever I approach mass cultural events – especially ones that seem to bear the conceit that they are “higher” and more culturally valuable than, say, a comic book fair – I am reminded of two of the 20th…
Could people get just as concerned about climate change as nuclear war? Nuclear war image from www.shutterstock.com

What can climate talks learn from the fight against nuclear weapons?

From the 1950s until the 1990s, nuclear weapons were viewed as the greatest threat to human life on the planet. Jonathan Schell, whose book The Fate of the Earth (1998) perhaps best crystallised the danger…
Australia’s GST is considered a regressive tax, so the idea of extending it to fresh food is considered unfair. A more detailed analysis reveals it’s not that simple. Charlotte90T/Flickr

Making the case for GST on fresh food

With the federal government’s review of taxation about to get underway, many are expecting Australia’s Goods and Services Tax to be up for change. In this GST series we take a closer look at the evidence…
Aviation emissions are growing at a time when other industries are reducing theirs. James Loesch/Flickr

It’s time for a global tax on aviation emissions

Aviation has an emissions problem. As an industry, both in the scope of its operations and the nature of its emissions, aviation has a significant effect on the environment. Despite this, aviation emissions…
James Thierrée’s Tabac Rouge - a ghoulish dreamscape “choreodrama” at Sydney Festival. AAP/Paul Miller

Theatre of disarray: Tabac Rouge at the 2015 Sydney Festival

French circus performer and director James Thierrée famously eschews comparison with his grandfather Charlie Chaplin, to whom he bears a conspicuous resemblance. But as he and his troupe stood on stage…
They way we relate to other people shapes our moral life – and that’s something that requires imagination. David Galindo/Flickr

The moral life might seem boring – but it takes imagination to live it

Creativity and imagination - it’s impossible to discuss one without reference to the other - are often discussed with regard to the great artists, thinkers, and visionaries of our world. Those are the…
Many hands have helped author The Conversation’s first collaborative writing experiment.

An experiment in collaborative writing: day ten

We’re starting 2015 with an experiment in collaborative creative writing. What happens when you ask ten academics to write a story together? Taking our cue from the Exquisite Cadaver game played by Surrealist…
Retail frenzy is a familiar feature of the festive season – but what about all the casual workers who labour through it? AAP Image/NEWZULU/PAUL THOMPSON

The paradox of work over the festive season

Yet the workers’ rights cannot be doomed to be the mere result of economic systems aimed at the maximisation of profits. Pope John Paul II, On Human Work, 1981. Written more than 20 years ago, the above…
It’s the season for giving gifts - but in a market economy, it’s easy to lose sight of what it means to give a gift. Ben Watkin/Flickr

In a gift economy, what makes a Christmas gift good?

This time every year we feverishly try to find just the right gift for everyone on our list. Merchants seizing upon the frenzy promise more and more for less and less, seeking to awaken desires we did…
Pilots have the privilege of a birds-eye view, but should they resist the temptation to snap from the cockpit? Frans Zwart/Flickr

When ‘selfies’ extend to plane cockpits, pilots could land themselves in trouble

Last week, Quartz published an article showcasing photographs pilots have taken from the cockpit of aircraft to post on Instagram. As explained in the story, by taking these photos – many of which appear…
It’s World Philosophy Day today, a good time to consider the tougher questions about our lives. Jef Safi/Flickr

Love, wisdom and wonder: three reasons to celebrate philosophy

Today is UNESCO World Philosophy Day, a day aimed to “underline the enduring value of philosophy for the development of human thought, for each culture and for each individual”. However, it was not so…

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