University of Adelaide

The University of Adelaide was established in 1874. It has built a continuing reputation through teaching and learning of high quality, through outstanding research, and through a strong tradition of community service.

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In the animal kingdom, males are somewhat dispensable, which might explain why males are more likely to die. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Why males are more likely to die from conception to old age

Miscarriages and stillbirths are more likely to involve males. After birth, male babies are also more likely to die or suffer major illness.
The rear of 30-32 Oxford Street, an area of Sydney affected by an outbreak of bubonic plague in 1900. Wikimedia/NSW State Archives

Why 100 years without slum housing in Australia is coming to an end

New research finds almost a million Australians are living in poor or very poor-quality housing, with more than 100,000 in dwellings regarded as very poor or derelict.
IVF is still an expensive, invasive process that can have significant side-effects. Nejron Photo/Shutterstock

Emerging infertility treatment could be a less invasive and cheaper alternative to IVF

Early studies suggest a process called advanced in-vitro maturation may be able to treat infertility without women needing to inject themselves with high doses of hormones for several weeks.
We’ve long heard we can’t blame people for their addiction because it’s a disease, but is it? from www.shutterstock.com.au

Viewpoints: is addiction a disease?

Some think labelling it a disease is a helpful way to think about addiction; others think this makes the addict helpless in their fight against addiction. Two academics debate both sides of the coin.
Social and financial pressures are driving many Australian women who want to have children to wait until later in life. mimagephotography/Shutterstock

How old is too old for a safe pregnancy?

Are there other risks and complications associated with pregnancy and childbirth in your 50s and 60s – or even your 40s?
Nine out of ten surveyed researchers said they engage with end-users to translate their work into practice. from www.shutterstock.com

Academics do want to engage with business, but need more support

Financial incentives alone won’t increase research collaboration between universities and business. Academics say they need time, support and an environment encouraging of engagement.

New evidence for BPA and obesity? Not so fast!

The headline image of the University of Melbourne’s Facebook link to its press release about recent research on Bisphenol A (BPA) is of a takeaway coffee cup. The kind that does not have any BPA in it…
Australia continues to enjoy voter turnout levels that are the envy of voluntary-voting regimes the world over. AAP/Lukas Coch

Election explainer: why do I have to vote, anyway?

The majority of Australians approve of compulsory voting – and have done so for decades. The nay-sayers continue to be a minority.
Housing costs are driving poorer families into areas with fewer and fewer opportunities. Kate Ausburn/flickr

Smart cities wouldn’t let housing costs drive the worse-off into deeper disadvantage

The 2016 articulation of an urban agenda assumes building more highways, railways and trams will produce better, more productive cities that somehow give everyone a job.
When does an internship cross the line and become unlawful? www.shutterstock.com

Are unpaid internships unlawful?

Employers run the risk of breaking the law if they are getting interns to do work that otherwise would be done by paid employees.
There is an unwavering, untested, bipartisan assertion on asylum seekers: no-one will be resettled in Australia, as that will encourage people smugglers. AAP/Eoin Blackwell

Resettling refugees in Australia would not resume the people-smuggling trade

History suggests that resettling refugees on Nauru and Manus Island in Australia and New Zealand will not enliven people smuggling between Indonesia and Christmas Island.
Fifteen years ago, The Avalanches won four awards at the 15th Annual ARIA Music Awards. How has music changed in a decade and a half? AAP Image/Dean Lewins

Can The Avalanches flourish in a pop music world remade in their own image?

The Avalanches' legendary first album, Since I Left You, was a modern classic, built from more than 3500 music samples. Sixteen years on, they're finally releasing a second one - but will it resonate in an age when everyone samples?
Advances in computing make it possible to model the spread of disease on an individual level, in a population of millions of people. Shutterstock/Maridav

Computing helps the study of infections on a global and local scale

Millions of people die or suffer from infectious diseases each year. Computer modelling can now help simulate the impact of any spreading disease.
We talk about food with moralising – and judgemental – language. Shutterstock

Tastes like moral superiority: what makes food ‘good’?

Locavore, freegan, kangatarian, flexitarian ... what we eat has become a moral minefield. Religions have long enforced food-related prohibitions, but in a secular context we could do with a little less moralising at the kitchen table.

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