University of California San Diego

At the University of California San Diego, we constantly push boundaries and challenge expectations. Established in 1960, UC San Diego has been shaped by exceptional scholars who aren’t afraid to take risks and redefine conventional wisdom. Today, as one of the top 15 research universities in the world, we are driving innovation and change to advance society, propel economic growth and make our world a better place. Learn more at www.ucsd.edu.

Links

Displaying 1 - 20 of 56 articles

Every surface of our body – inside and out – is covered in microorganisms: bacteria, viruses, fungi and many other microscopic life forms. vrx/Shutterstock.com

Meet the trillions of viruses that make up your virome

Just because you don't have the flu doesn't mean that your aren't teeming with viruses inside and out. But what are all these viruses doing, if they aren't making you sick?
A postage stamp printed in Norway showing an image of Alfred Nobel, circa 2001. catwalker/Shutterstock.com

Should all Nobel Prizes be canceled for a year?

This year's Nobel Prize for literature was nixed because of a sex scandal. Other Nobels have neglected key contributors. Should all prizes be cancelled while criteria for winning is reassessed?
Nuevos records de suicidio indican que en México, varios años de baños de sangre sin precedentes han traumatizado a los residentes en las zonas donde existe mayor violencia. Reuters/Jorge Lopez

Violencia crónica de México afecta la salud mental, con consecuencias fatales: más suicidios

Ciudad Juárez, en la frontera EEUU-México, ha sufrido altas tasas de homicidio por 12 años. Nuevos datos de suicidio revela que vivir con violencia crónica tiene graves impactos en la salud mental.
New suicide data indicates that years of record bloodshed in Mexico have traumatized residents in places where the violence is most concentrated. Reuters/Jorge Lopez

Rising suicides in Mexico expose the mental health toll of living with extreme, chronic violence

Ciudad Juárez, on the US-Mexico border, has suffered high levels of deadly violence for over a decade. New suicide data reveals the severe mental health impacts of living with chronic violence.
California’s San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station was shut down in 2013. julius fekete/shutterstock.com

The demise of US nuclear power in 4 charts

Commercial nuclear reactors provide roughly one-fifth of the electricity produced in the US. But they face grave threats to their continued operation.
Sitting can do more than give you a headache. It is linked to diabetes and obesity. Stockfour/Shutterstock.com

Sitting and diabetes in older adults: Does timing matter?

Researchers are learning even more about how a sedentary lifestyle is bad for our bodies. A recent study shows a link between sitting patterns and diabetes in older people.
The northeast edge of the Venable Ice Shelf, near Antarctica’s Allison Peninsula. NASA/John Sonntag

Short-term changes in Antarctica’s ice shelves are key to predicting their long-term fate

Last summer one of Antarctica's floating ice shelves calved an iceberg the size of Delaware – but scientists say other less dramatic changes reveal more about how and why Antarctica is changing.
Though examining poop samples scientists working on the American Gut Project are getting a new perspective on the microbes in our guts. By Christos Georghiou/Shutterstock.com

Studying poop samples, scientists find clues on health and disease

In the largest citizen science experiment to date, 11,336 people sent poop samples to this San Diego lab so that microbiologists could figure out how the microbes in our guts make us healthy or sick.
Watching bacteria and viruses duke it out, evolving to outwit each other. UC San Diego

Discovery of a surprise multitasking gene helps explain how new functions and features evolve

A core idea in molecular biology is that one gene codes for one protein. Now biologists have found an example of a gene that yields two forms of a protein – enabling it to evolve new functionality.
Having to own multiple cars comes at a cost to the finances and health of residents in the sprawling outer suburbs. David Crosling/AAP

Designing suburbs to cut car use closes gaps in health and wealth

One of the most effective ways to reduce health inequalities across Australia is to design neighbourhoods that free residents from having to rely on cars for transport.
A man taking stairs at Washington-Dulles International Airport in 2013. Wikimedia Commons

One step at a time: Simple nudges can increase lifestyle physical activity

Dropping old, bad habits is hard, but starting new, good ones may not be so difficult. Or so a recent study suggests. Read how a simple sign at an airport made a difference.

Research and Expert Database

Authors

More Authors