University of California San Diego

At the University of California San Diego, we constantly push boundaries and challenge expectations. Established in 1960, UC San Diego has been shaped by exceptional scholars who aren’t afraid to take risks and redefine conventional wisdom. Today, as one of the top 15 research universities in the world, we are driving innovation and change to advance society, propel economic growth and make our world a better place. Learn more at www.ucsd.edu.

Links

Displaying 1 - 20 of 43 articles

The northeast edge of the Venable Ice Shelf, near Antarctica’s Allison Peninsula. NASA/John Sonntag

Short-term changes in Antarctica’s ice shelves are key to predicting their long-term fate

Last summer one of Antarctica's floating ice shelves calved an iceberg the size of Delaware – but scientists say other less dramatic changes reveal more about how and why Antarctica is changing.
Though examining poop samples scientists working on the American Gut Project are getting a new perspective on the microbes in our guts. By Christos Georghiou/Shutterstock.com

Studying poop samples, scientists find clues on health and disease

In the largest citizen science experiment to date, 11,336 people sent poop samples to this San Diego lab so that microbiologists could figure out how the microbes in our guts make us healthy or sick.
Watching bacteria and viruses duke it out, evolving to outwit each other. UC San Diego

Discovery of a surprise multitasking gene helps explain how new functions and features evolve

A core idea in molecular biology is that one gene codes for one protein. Now biologists have found an example of a gene that yields two forms of a protein – enabling it to evolve new functionality.
Having to own multiple cars comes at a cost to the finances and health of residents in the sprawling outer suburbs. David Crosling/AAP

Designing suburbs to cut car use closes gaps in health and wealth

One of the most effective ways to reduce health inequalities across Australia is to design neighbourhoods that free residents from having to rely on cars for transport.
A man taking stairs at Washington-Dulles International Airport in 2013. Wikimedia Commons

One step at a time: Simple nudges can increase lifestyle physical activity

Dropping old, bad habits is hard, but starting new, good ones may not be so difficult. Or so a recent study suggests. Read how a simple sign at an airport made a difference.
Computer training can decrease children’s biases. Jeff Inglis

How to combat racial bias: Start in childhood

Racial bias is associated with dehumanizing social groups different from your own. Psychologists trained kids to differentiate individuals of another race – with lasting effects on their biases.
Staying physically active can play a big part in ageing well – and a well-designed neighbourhood helps with that. Maylat/shutterstock

Eight simple changes to our neighbourhoods can help us age well

Our ageing population presents several social and economic challenges, particularly for the health sector. Physical activity can tackle many of these.
It’s actually a big developmental milestone. BlurryMe/Shutterstock.com

Watching children learn how to lie

In a new study, psychologists observed young children in real time figuring out how not to tell the truth.
Businessmen pass by Occupy Wall Street protesters at New York’s Zuccotti Park in 2011. AP Photo/Kathy Willens

Are the rich more selfish than the rest of us?

The wealthy evade taxes and are less likely to donate to charity, but does this mean they're more selfish than everyone else? New research suggests not.
A rally against President Donald Trump’s order that restricts travel to the U.S. AP Photo/Steven Senne

Trump’s immigration order is bad foreign policy

This isn't the first time the US has banned people based on nationality. History shows these exclusions have put our national security at risk and caused rifts with foreign allies.
A Miami police officer looks at a driver’s license he requested from a motorist at a DUI checkpoint. AP Photo/Lynne Sladky

With legal pot comes a problem: How do we weed out impaired drivers?

We have a reliable and easy-to-use test to measure blood alcohol concentration. But right now we don't have a fast, reliable test to gauge whether someone is too doped up to drive.

Research and Expert Database

Authors

More Authors