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Displaying 1 - 20 of 67 articles

The civil rights of 11.3 million Mexican nationals who live in the US are routinely violated, according to a comprehensive new report on U.S. immigration enforcement since 2009. AP Photo/Matt York

Mexicans in US routinely confront legal abuse, racial profiling, ICE targeting and other civil rights violations

A new report on Mexicans in the US paints a troubling picture about the treatment of the country's largest immigrant group.
The San Pedro Mezquital River is the last free-flowing river in Mexico’s western Sierra Madre. Octavio Aburto

Hydropower dams can harm coastal areas far downstream

Thousands of hydropower dams are under construction around the world. New research shows that by cutting off sediment flow, these dams can have big ecological effects on far-off bays and deltas.
These are viruses called bacteriophages that infect only bacterial cells. Ewa Parylak/shutterstock.com

Are viruses the best weapon for fighting superbugs?

Bacteria are becoming resistant to even the most powerful antibiotics. These expensive, hard-to-treat infections are prompting physicians to reassess using viruses to destroy bacteria.
Standing up when doing routine things such as talking on the phone can reduce the amount of time a person sits. YoloStock/Shutterstock.com

Can sitting less decrease your risk of heart disease?

Sitting has been maligned in recent years for its role in obesity and diabetes. Now, a recent study in older women suggests that sedentary behavior may also increase heart disease risk.
A Chinese scientist claims he edited the DNA of twin girls during an in vitro fertilization procedure. CI Photos / Shutterstock.com

The road to enhancement, via human gene editing, is paved with good intentions

A Chinese scientist has revealed he edited the DNA of twin girls born through in vitro fertilization. These girls are designed to be resistant to HIV. Is the edit a medical necessity or an enhancement?
A capsule with a genetically engineered bacterium for therapeutic purposes. abrakadabra / Shutterstock.com

Living drugs: Engineering bacteria to treat genetic diseases

Researchers are exploring the possibility of creating living drugs – designer microbes that can live in our guts and provide critical components that our body needs but can't make itself.
People plus machines will surpass the capabilities of either element alone. metamorworks/Shutterstock.com

Artificial intelligence will make you smarter

Artificial intelligence techniques like deep learning and reinforcement learning are getting increasingly advanced and capable of helping people with a wide range of complex tasks.
Every surface of our body – inside and out – is covered in microorganisms: bacteria, viruses, fungi and many other microscopic life forms. vrx/Shutterstock.com

Meet the trillions of viruses that make up your virome

Just because you don't have the flu doesn't mean that your aren't teeming with viruses inside and out. But what are all these viruses doing, if they aren't making you sick?
A postage stamp printed in Norway showing an image of Alfred Nobel, circa 2001. catwalker/Shutterstock.com

Should all Nobel Prizes be canceled for a year?

This year's Nobel Prize for literature was nixed because of a sex scandal. Other Nobels have neglected key contributors. Should all prizes be cancelled while criteria for winning is reassessed?
Nuevos records de suicidio indican que en México, varios años de baños de sangre sin precedentes han traumatizado a los residentes en las zonas donde existe mayor violencia. Reuters/Jorge Lopez

Violencia crónica de México afecta la salud mental, con consecuencias fatales: más suicidios

Ciudad Juárez, en la frontera EEUU-México, ha sufrido altas tasas de homicidio por 12 años. Nuevos datos de suicidio revela que vivir con violencia crónica tiene graves impactos en la salud mental.
New suicide data indicates that years of record bloodshed in Mexico have traumatized residents in places where the violence is most concentrated. Reuters/Jorge Lopez

Rising suicides in Mexico expose the mental health toll of living with extreme, chronic violence

Ciudad Juárez, on the US-Mexico border, has suffered high levels of deadly violence for over a decade. New suicide data reveals the severe mental health impacts of living with chronic violence.

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