University of Florida

The University of Florida (UF) is a major, public, comprehensive, land-grant, research university. The state’s oldest and most comprehensive university, UF is among the nation’s most academically diverse public universities.

UF has a long history of established programs in international education, research and service. It is one of only 17 public, land-grant universities that belongs to the Association of American Universities.

In 1853, the state-funded East Florida Seminary took over the Kingsbury Academy in Ocala. The seminary moved to Gainesville in the 1860s and later was consolidated with the state’s land-grant Florida Agricultural College, then in Lake City. In 1905, by legislative action, the college became a university and was moved to Gainesville. Classes first met with 102 students on the present site on Sept. 26, 1906. UF officially opened its doors to women in 1947. With more than 50,000 students, UF is now one of the largest universities in the nation.

UF has a 2,000-acre campus and more than 900 buildings (including 170 with classrooms and laboratories). The northeast corner of campus is listed as a Historic District on the National Register of Historic Places. The UF residence halls have a total capacity of some 7,500 students and the five family housing villages house more than 1,000 married and graduate students.

UF’s extensive capital improvement program has resulted in facilities ideal for 21st century academics and research, including the Health Professions, Nursing and Pharmacy Building; the Cancer and Genetics Research Center; the new Biomedical Sciences Building; and William R. Hough Hall, which houses the Hough Graduate School of Business. Overall, the university’s current facilities have a book value of more than $1 billion and a replacement value of $2 billion.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 210 articles

Physical therapists Steven Hunter and Laura Hayes teach an unidentified patient lumbar stabilization exercises at the Equal Access Clinic in Gainesville, Florida. Maria Belen Farias, UF Health Photography

Physical therapy could lower need for opioids, but lack of money and time are hurdles

As the nation grapples with its opioid addiction epidemic, one solution for many with chronic joint pain and back pain could be physical therapy. But it's often underutilized. Here's why.
Psorophora ferox female, a potential vector for Madariaga virus. Photo taken on Heritage Island, Anacostia River, in Washington, D.C., June 30, 2012. Wikimedia Commons

As Venezuela’s public health system collapses, mosquito-borne viruses re-emerge

The collapse of Venezuela's public health system has terrible consequences inside the country, but it also is giving rise to mosquito-borne viruses that could spread to nearby countries.
Florida’s Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson meets with residents of Miami’s Little Haiti neighborhood, where Donald Trump also campaigned in 2016. AP Photo/Alan Diaz

Why Florida Democrats can’t count on the so-called ‘black vote’

Caribbean immigrants in Miami are upending old assumptions about black voters in Florida. Neither party should take them for granted in this November's midterm election.
Pain from migraine headaches is a major cause of disability. A new drug could prevent them, in some cases. R. Nial Bradshaw/Flickr

New migraine drug: A neurologist explains how it works

A new preventive drug for migraines was approved recently by the FDA. Here's how it works, and how others in the pipeline might be able to help the millions who suffer from migraines.
Financial decisions can be a real maze. Andrii Vodolazhskyi/Shutterstock.com

Why we hate making financial decisions – and what to do about it

Research suggests that the reason people may put off funding their 401(k) plans or managing credit card debt is because our perception of finance as 'cold' conflicts with our hot-blooded emotions.
HIV becomes dormant in the body and can hide in brain cells. Joseph Lebowitz, Dr. Min Lin, and Dr. Habibeh Khoshboue

HIV lies dormant in brain, increasing risk of dementia, but how?

While drugs have been developed to treat HIV and AIDS, the virus can still lie dormant in the brain, increasing the risk for brain disease such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.
Women’s sexual pleasure has not been stressed as much as men’s. Lucky Business/Shutterstock.com

The orgasm gap: Picking up where the sexual revolution left off

The sexual revolution made it acceptable for women to have premarital sex. Yet, an orgasm gap remains. Addressing the cultural forces driving this gap has social implications beyond pleasure itself.
It’s worrying, and potentially dangerous, when someone peels back the curtain of another’s identity. The Conversation, from Brian A. Jackson/Shutterstock.com and Kansas Department of Transportation via AP

What is doxxing, and why is it so scary?

Most people have all sorts of breadcrumbs of their identity scattered around the internet. A dedicated sleuth can piece them together and reveal private information in a very public way.

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