University of Ghana

The University of Ghana, the premier and largest university in Ghana, was founded as the University College of the Gold Coast by Ordinance on August 11, 1948 for the purpose of providing and promoting university education, learning and research.

University of Ghana is run on a collegiate system and comprises the following colleges:

· College of Basic and Applied Sciences www.cbas.ug.edu.gh

· College of Education www.coe.ug.edu.gh

· College of Health Sciences www.chs.ug.edu.gh

· College of Humanities www.coh.ug.edu.gh

In addition, the University has several research institutions and centres for learning and research, including Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research (NMIR), www.noguchimedres.org; Centre for Tropical, Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Regional Institute for Population Studies, rips-ug.edu.gh; Institute for Environmental and Sanitation Studies, iess.ug.edu.gh; and the Institute for Statistical, Social and Economic Research, isser.edu.gh.

As part of its vision to become a world class research intensive institution, University of Ghana has identified four priority areas where the university will focus and promote international collaboration in research initiatives to enhance the University’s research output. These research areas are:
• Malaria Research
• Trans-disciplinary Research into Climate Change Adaptation
• Enhancing Food Production and Processing
• Development Policy and Poverty Monitoring and Evaluation

The University aims to produce the next generation of thought leaders to drive national development. Through our research institutes and other centres of learning and research, faculty members are involved in studies that support policy making for national development, often in collaboration with other international institutions.

There are currently a number of Ghanaian and international institutions that hold affiliation with the University of Ghana. As a leader in tertiary education, the University has established several link agreements with universities in Africa, Europe and North America for student, faculty and staff exchange as well as collaborative research.

The student population is over 38,000 made up of students enrolled on our regular programmes, sandwich programmes, and distance education as well as students from affiliate institutions. Our growing number of international students come from over 70 countries to join either our regular undergraduate and graduate programmes, enroll on our study abroad and other special programmes designed for international students.

The University of Ghana has built an image as one of the continent’s reputable universities which makes the University of Ghana the first choice for academics, researchers and students.

Links

Displaying all articles

Agriculture remains the major source of employment in Ghana, even though its share in the economy has been in steady decline. Reuters/Thierry Gouegnon

Ghana needs a new strategy to create decent jobs and reduce inequality

Economic growth is a necessary condition for development. But it can only pass the sufficient condition test if growth translates into high-earning jobs. Ghana's recent history illustrates this.
There are very clear ideas in Ghana about what girls can and should do, and how boys ought to behave. EPA/Nic Bothma

How parenting in Ghana shapes sexist stereotypes

Ghanaians believe that boys and girls should be raised very differently. This feeds into strongly defined traditional gender roles and ultimately leads to women having a lower social status.
Distance learning is one way for Ghanaian entrepreneurs like Sena Ahadji to earn degrees without giving up their work. Francis Kokoroko/Reuters

How Ghana’s universities are trying to open the doors of learning

Ghana's universities are working hard to bring in more students – including those who can't afford to study full time and want good quality distance learning options.
Ghana’s education system has been slammed in a new global report. Could making schools more culturally savvy fix the problem? Nic Bothma/EPA

Respecting culture could fix Ghana schools’ problems

Critics of Ghana's education system suggest that making local cultural values a fundamental part of the education system will create a happier, more harmonious society.

Research and Expert Database

Authors

More Authors