University of Ibadan

The University of Ibadan is the oldest and one of the most prestigious Nigerian universities, and is located five miles from the centre of the major city of Ibadan in Western Nigeria.

Besides the College of Medicine, there are now ten other faculties: Arts, Science, Agriculture and Forestry, Social Sciences, Education, Veterinary Medicine, Technology, Law, Public Health and Dentistry. The University has residential and sports facilities for staff and students on campus, as well as separate botanical and zoological gardens.

The University of Ibadan has as its vision to be a world-class institution for academic excellence geared towards meeting societal needs’ and it’s mission is to:

•To expand the frontiers of knowledge through provision of excellent conditions for learning and research. •To produce graduates who are worthy in character and sound judgement. •To contribute to the transformation of society through creativity and innovation. •To serve as a dynamic custodian of society’s salutary values and thus sustain its integrity.

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