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Displaying 1 - 20 of 124 articles

A regenerating stand of rainforest in northern Costa Rica. Matthew Fagan

Restoring tropical forests isn’t meaningful if those forests only stand for 10 or 20 years

Many nations are restoring degraded tropical forests to slow climate change, protect endangered species and improve rural life. But those forests often are cleared again soon afterward.
Artist Jennifer Rubell hired a model to vacuum for two hours each night from Feb. 1 to Feb. 17. Ryan Maxwell Photography

Ivanka and her tower of crumbs

A new piece of performance art features a lookalike Ivanka Trump vacuuming crumbs. Not only is it a cutting commentary on labor and gender, but it also highlights the complicity of the viewer.
Architect and designer Florence Knoll Bassett poses with her dog, Cartree, in this photograph circa 1950. Courtesy Knoll Archive

Florence Knoll Bassett’s mid-century design diplomacy

Knoll is best known for transforming the design of America's corporate offices. But she was also on the front lines of a State Department effort to promote American ingenuity and capitalism abroad.
School experiments with new ways to discipline students without suspending them show mixed results. Africa Studio / www.shutterstock.com

Restorative practices may not be the solution, but neither are suspensions

Although new evidence shows mixed results for "restorative justice" practices, that's no reason for schools to stop looking for alternatives to school suspensions, a school safety scholar argues.
Look out for Russian influence. M-SUR/Shutterstock.com

Countering Russian disinformation the Baltic nations’ way

European countries, especially the Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, have confronted Russian disinformation campaigns for decades. The US can learn from their experience.
A family from the Central American migrant caravan at the U.S.-Mexico border in Tijuana. Reuters/Lucy Nicholson

Who is responsible for migrants?

Donald Trump portrays migrants as a foreign problem 'dumped' on America's doorstep. That view ignores the global forces that bind nations together, including trade, climate change and colonization.
A new statistical test lets scientists figure out if two groups are similar to one another. paleontologist natural/shutterstock.com

The equivalence test: A new way for scientists to tackle so-called negative results

A new statistical test lets researchers search for similarities between groups. Could this help keep new important findings out of the file drawer?
As Americans go to the polls, the voting process and the information environment are still not secure. AP Photo/David Goldman

Threats remain to US voting system – and voters’ perceptions of reality

Protecting democracy requires more than just technical solutions. It includes education, critical thinking and members of society working together to agree on problems and find solutions.
Demonstrators with cut-outs of congressional districts in front of the Supreme Court. Reuters/Joshua Roberts

4 reasons gerrymandering is getting worse

One of the main reasons polarization in the US is on the rise – the way congressional seats are drawn to favor parties – isn't going away anytime soon.
Mole Day is an unofficial holiday celebrated among chemists on Oct. 23, between 6:02 a.m. and 6:02 p.m. The time and date are derived from Avogadro’s number. Ekaterina_Minaeva/Shutterstock.com

A day to celebrate chemistry’s favorite unit — the mole. But what’s a mole?

Chemists sure know how to party. And here is the proof. On October 23rd they celebrate their hallowed unit: the mole. Find out what that's all about.
‘Girl With a Balloon’ was renamed ‘Love Is in the Bin,’ after it self-destructed at a Sotheby’s auction on Oct. 5. Sotheby's

Banksy and the tradition of destroying art

When artists destroy their works, it's usually to express their disdain for critics, dealers and curators. But does this get lost in the attention, hype and money that follows?
When many people hear the word cloning, they imagine armies of human clones created for nefarious purposes. andriano.cz/Shutterstock.com

Could villains clone themselves to take over the world?

A scientist explains how researchers use cloning in the lab and what is the difference between cloning a gene versus cloning an entire organism.
Cómo lograr que su hijo esté listo para la escuela. Studio.g photography/shutterstock

5 habilidades matemáticas que los niños en edad preescolar deben aprender: enséñeselas de forma divertida

A través de juegos y tareas domésticas, los padres pueden enseñar a sus hijos habilidades básicas de matemáticas, como contar, algo de geometría y pensamiento algebraico.
Hindu texts from thousands of years ago demonstrate acceptance of a ‘third gender.’ Today, transgender Indians, or hijras, remain visible members of society. AP Photo/Bikas Das

India’s sodomy ban, now ruled illegal, was a British colonial legacy

Before colonialism, India embraced homosexuality and gender fluidity. The Supreme Court's repeal of a 157-year-old gay sex ban partially reclaims that history, but LGBTQ Indians still face hurdles.

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