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Displaying 1 - 20 of 80 articles

What’s inside Olympians’ skis? AP Photo/Luca Bruno

Making skis strong enough for Olympians to race on

Highly engineered composite materials let skis ride smoothly, carve neatly and turn quickly – for top athletes and regular consumers alike.
The tech sector has long had a diversity problem. AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

White men may be biggest winners when a city snags Amazon’s HQ2

Amazon, like the entire tech sector, has suffered from a lack of diversity in its workforce. This trend is likely to continue when it opens a second headquarters in one of 20 cities.
How fast can quantum computing get? Research shows there’s a limit. Vladvm/Shutterstock.com

Quantum speed limit may put brakes on quantum computers

A future that continues to have increasingly fast computing depends on quantum physics – but research is showing that there are limits to how fast quantum computers can go.
Though not this obvious from the outside, plants are keeping time. Hua Lu

Studying circadian rhythms in plants and their pathogens might lead to precision medicine for people

Precisely calibrated timekeepers are found in organisms from all domains of life. Biologists are studying how they influence plant/pathogen interactions – what they learn could lead to human medicines.
International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach stands between Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garrett to announce winning bids for the upcoming games. AP Photo/Martin Mejia

Paris and Los Angeles bids to host Olympics expose deeper crisis at Olympic Games

The benefits of hosting the Olympics are so slim, or nonexistent, that fewer cities are bidding to host the games. That's a sign of serious trouble.
Colleen Burge counts oysters on an oyster aquaculture lease in California. Collin Closek

A deadly herpes virus is threatening oysters around the world

Oysters grow in seawater and filter their food from it, so how do you shield them from waterborne diseases? Scientists are working to develop strains that are resistant to a fast-spreading herpes virus.
Robots can also lend a hand of sorts. Photographee.eu/Shutterstock.com

How robots could help bridge the elder-care gap

Robots have the potential to help support a growing population that wants to age in their own homes. But those helpful machines won't be the humanoid butlers of science fiction.
When President Bill Cllinton officially ended welfare as we knew it, he was flanked by women who had received Aid to Families with Dependent Children. Reuters/Stephen Jaffee

Welfare as we know it now: 6 questions answered

Trump's rationale for cutting the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families program rests on a myth at odds with contemporary data.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who announced June 27 that a vote on the Senate health care bill has been delayed until after the July 4 recess. Carolyn Kaster/AP

Republican health care bills defy the party’s own ideology

The health care bill proposed by Senate Republicans was little better than the House version, which begs an important question: Who's driving health care law – a free market or insurance companies?
The High Line in New York City, a former elevated railroad trestle converted to a public park. Shinya Suzuki/Flickr

Urban nature: What kinds of plants and wildlife flourish in cities?

In an urbanizing world, people increasingly are seeking out nature in cities. Research shows that diverse species of animals, plants and insects can thrive in areas that humans have altered.
How can we change math instruction to meet the needs of today’s kids? World Bank Photo Collection / flickr

Challenging the status quo in mathematics: Teaching for understanding

Math instruction is stuck in the last century. How can we change teaching methods to move past rote memorization and help students develop a more meaningful understanding – and be better at math?

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