University of Maryland, Baltimore County

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 138 articles

The Supreme Court is empty days before the justices vote to on the U.S. gerrymandering case. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

After Supreme Court decision, gerrymandering fix is up to voters

The Supreme Court has issued what's likely to be its final word on partisan gerrymandering, saying it's a political issue, not a legal one. That means reform lies in the hands of voters.
Migrant agricultural workers kept out of the US by tough immigration laws are now being replaced by prison labor. Shutterstock

Convicts are returning to farming – anti-immigrant policies are the reason

Since Reconstruction, states have leased prisoners to US industries. That diminished in the 20th century, but now it's resurging, with prisoners leased to harvest food for American consumers.
Spider glue is actually a specialized silk protein. Sarah Stellwagen

Spider glue’s sticky secret revealed by new genetic research

The glue that gives spider webs their stickiness is a form of spider silk protein. Researchers can imagine cool uses for a synthetic version – but had to wait for the tricky glue gene to be sequenced.
Many of Baltimore’s city services are crippled by a cyberattack. The Conversation from City of Baltimore and Love Silhouette/Shutterstock.com

Hackers seek ransoms from Baltimore and communities across the US

Ransomware has crippled governments and companies around the world, encrypting data and demanding payment for the decryption key – though that's no guarantee of recovering the information.
Assistant professor of chemistry Sidney Wilkerson-Hill, left, in a chemistry lab at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with Bolatito Babatunde, a student in the Chancellor’s Science Scholars program at UNC. Lars Sahl / UNC Chemistry

Here’s how to increase diversity in STEM at the college level and beyond

Researchers find promising results for two programs patterned after the Meyerhoff Scholars Program, a renowned initiative launched at UMBC in the 1980s and known to increase diversity in STEM.
Duke Ellington leads his orchestra in a rehearsal in Coventry, England, on Dec. 2, 1966. Associated Press

Duke Ellington’s melodies carried his message of social justice

From spirituals about the trials of slavery to the fight for civil rights and the modern rhythms of swing music, Duke Ellington told a story about black life that was both beautiful and complex.
Japan’s Crown Prince Naruhito and Crown Princess Masako at their residence Togu Palace in Tokyo, Feb. 17, 2019. Imperial Household Agency of Japan/Handout via Reuters

Japan’s new emperor is a modern, multilingual environmentalist

Japan's 86-year-old Emperor Akihito abdicates on April 30 — an exceedingly rare event for this ancient monarchy. Can his son, Prince Naruhito, give Japan's royal family a modern makeover?
Members of East Baltimore Church of God, which was founded by Lumbee Indians, and was once located in the heart of ‘the reservation,’ in the 1700 block of E. Baltimore Street. Photo courtesy of Rev. Robert E. Dodson Jr., Pastor, East Baltimore Church of God

A quest to reconstruct Baltimore’s American Indian ‘reservation’

A folklorist is working to preserve the history of a unique, urban community of Lumbee Indians.
Cigarettes have been known for years to cause many diseases. Tobacco companies now have to pay $9 billion each year to help states pay for the costs of treatment to people they sickened. Protosav-AN/Shutterstock.com

April 15 is the day tobacco companies pay $9 billion for tobacco illnesses, but is it enough?

April 15 is not only a day to pay individual taxes to the IRS. It is also the day that tobacco companies must pay a penalty to help offset states' costs for the treatment of tobacco-related diseases.
Activists at the Supreme Court opposed to partisan gerrymandering hold up representations of congressional districts from North Carolina, left, and Maryland, right. AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

Want to fix gerrymandering? Then the Supreme Court needs to listen to mathematicians

Supreme Court justices have previously called statistical methods of measuring partisan gerrymandering 'sociological gobbledygook' and 'a bunch of baloney.'
A regenerating stand of rainforest in northern Costa Rica. Matthew Fagan

Restoring tropical forests isn’t meaningful if those forests only stand for 10 or 20 years

Many nations are restoring degraded tropical forests to slow climate change, protect endangered species and improve rural life. But those forests often are cleared again soon afterward.
Artist Jennifer Rubell hired a model to vacuum for two hours each night from Feb. 1 to Feb. 17. Ryan Maxwell Photography

Ivanka and her tower of crumbs

A new piece of performance art features a lookalike Ivanka Trump vacuuming crumbs. Not only is it a cutting commentary on labor and gender, but it also highlights the complicity of the viewer.
Architect and designer Florence Knoll Bassett poses with her dog, Cartree, in this photograph circa 1950. Courtesy Knoll Archive

Florence Knoll Bassett’s mid-century design diplomacy

Knoll is best known for transforming the design of America's corporate offices. But she was also on the front lines of a State Department effort to promote American ingenuity and capitalism abroad.

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