University of Melbourne

The University of Melbourne is an internationally recognised, research-intensive university with a strong tradition of excellence in teaching, research and community engagement spanning more than 160 years.

Its outstanding performance in international rankings puts the University of Melbourne at the forefront of higher education globally. It is ranked number 1 in Australia by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings and 28th worldwide. Melbourne’s position as Australia’s top University has also been reaffirmed in the 2013 Shanghai Jiao Tong rankings, in which it has moved up three places from last year, to equal 54th in the world and third in the Asia-Pacific.

The University is uniquely located on the fringe of the city of Melbourne’s central business district. It serves as a hub for the Parkville research precinct – one of the world’s leading centres of medical and biotechnological research – and is a vital part of surrounding neighbourhoods such as cosmopolitan Carlton.

About 50,000 of the best and brightest students from around the globe come to study at the University of Melbourne.

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The Longman byelection is so tightly contested it has drawn many senior politicians to campaign. Here Labor candidate Susan Lamb is flanked by Shadow Minister for Skills, TAFE and Apprenticeships Doug Cameron, and Deputy Leader of the Opposition Tanya Plibersek. AAP/Glenn Hunt

As Super Saturday nears, Labor gains poll lead in Braddon, but trails in Longman, while UK Tories slump

With the much anticipated Super Saturday byelections on Saturday, the polls in Longman and Braddon still show a very tight race.
Transport and livestock are both significant contributors to nitrogen pollution. Annalucia/Shutterstock.com

You’ve heard of a carbon footprint – now it’s time to take steps to cut your nitrogen footprint

The University of Melbourne is the first institution in Australia to have its nitrogen footprint calculated – it's 139 tonnes per year, mainly because of food production, energy use and transport.
Guy Pearce as the Chandleresque private investigator Jack Irish: in the early years of Australian crime fiction, convicts and bushrangers featured prominently. Lachlan Moore

Friday essay: from convicts to contemporary convictions – 200 years of Australian crime fiction

Australia's rich tradition of crime fiction is little known – early tales told of bushrangers and convicts, one hero was a mining engineer turned amateur detective – but it reveals a range of national myths and fantasies.

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