University of Michigan

Founded in 1817, the University of Michigan is widely recognized as one of the world’s leading research universities. The hallmark of the university is the breadth of excellence across its 19 schools and colleges and the exceptional degree of interdisciplinary cooperation among them.

With more than a billion dollars in research expenditures annually, and 100 graduate and professional programs ranked in the top ten in the latest U.S. News & World Report rankings, U-M is a global leader in science and technology; health, law and public policy; the arts and humanities; and a wide range of other academic disciplines.

More than 61,000 students on three University of Michigan campuses (Ann Arbor, Dearborn and Flint) come from every state and 129 countries. And with more than 540,000 living degree holders, U-M has one of the nation’s largest alumni bodies.

Discover more on the U-M website: www.umich.edu

Links

Displaying 1 - 20 of 214 articles

A basic design of a light-based chip. Arnab Hazari

The future of electronics is light

As electronic transistors get tinier, they approach a point at which they won't be able to get smaller. How can we keep shrinking our devices, and making them more powerful at the same time? Light.
In this April 2, 2015, file photo, a visitor leaves the Sacramento Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Rancho Cordova, California. AP/Rich Pedroncelli, File

Caring for veterans: A privilege and a duty

A physician who has spent 25 years working within VA hospitals reflects on what it has meant to him to serve those who have served our country.
Trump’s energy plan will be fossil fuels on steroids combined with efforts to roll back limits on greenhouse gases. AP Photo/Eric Gay

What President Trump means for the future of energy and climate

President-elect Trump's objective on energy and climate is clear: Undo Obama's legacy of environmental regulations and massively expand fossil fuel production.
People around the world woke up to a new U.S. president-elect. Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

What Donald Trump’s surprise victory means for the economy and business

Four of our economic scholars weigh in on Trump's legislative agenda, healing the divide, uncertainty and something known as the 'presidential puzzle.'
Wang Qishan (centre), head of China’s anti-corruption watchdog, talks to President Xi Jinping in the Great Hall of the People, Beijing. Jason lee/Reuters

With its corruption crackdown, China is also stamping out innovation

President Xi Jinping has set himself up with an impossible task: keep the economy humming under state domination, while trying to eradicate corruption.
Cheerleaders and smartphones are in the Supreme Court’s hands. Stephan Savoia/AP

What do cheerleader uniforms and smartphones have in common?

The Supreme Court is considering two cases stemming from the merger of design and function that could reshape intellectual property law. Can we protect innovation without impeding fair competition?
Parents should be involved in their children’s use of electronic devices. Parent and child with tablet via shutterstock.com

How should we teach our kids to use digital media?

The lead author of a new American Academy of Pediatrics statement summarizes important guidelines for children's use of electronic devices.
A fun game, plus science advancement. Madde/YouTube

Play video games, advance science

We recently set up a Foldit competition between gamers, undergraduate students and professional scientists. The winner might surprise you – and offer important possibilities for scientific research.

Research and Expert Database

Authors

More Authors