University of South Florida

The University of South Florida is a global research university dedicated to student success and student accessibility through a vibrant, interdisciplinary, and learner centered research environment that incorporates a global curriculum. USF is committed to engage in research that will have a positive impact on the greater community. The University ranks 25th in the nation among public universities for total research expenditures by the National Science Foundation (2014).

Founded in 1956, USF was the first independent state university conceived, planned, and built in the 20th century. The university has developed into one of the nation’s leading research institutions. The USF System is comprised of the main doctoral-granting, research-intensive campus in Tampa, as well as USF St. Petersburg, and USF Sarasota-Manatee. It is home to nearly 50,000 students from over 130 different countries, making USF one of the 40 most diverse public institutions in the nation, and the second most diverse in the state of Florida.

USF students study in more than 79 undergraduate programs, 105 graduate programs, and 49 doctoral programs. The USF Tampa campus has 14 distinct colleges, all of which contribute to our greater social and economic impact, these include; College of The Arts, College of Arts and Sciences, College of Behavioral and Community Sciences, Muma College of Business, College of Education, College of Engineering, Patel College of Global Sustainability, College of Graduate Studies, Honors College, College of Marine Science, Morsani College of Medicine, College of Nursing, College of Pharmacy, and the College of Public Health.

Follow us on Twitter: @USouthFlorida


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What’s in the mind of a solo attacker? Man with gun image via

What drives lone offenders?

Lone offender – sometimes called "lone wolf" – attacks may become a more prevalent threat. What can we understand about them and the people who carry them out?
Aedes aegypti mosquitoes at the Laboratory of Entomology and Ecology of the Dengue Branch of the CDC in San Juan. Alvin Baez/Reuters

Understanding mosquitoes can help us find better ways to kill them

While no one likes getting bitten by mosquitoes, you might be surprised (and even a little fascinated) at the complex adaptions mosquitoes have developed to locate their favorite food sources.
A Dallas police officer makes his way to the funeral of Baton Rouge officer Montrell Jackson. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman

Not easy being blue: Fatal shootings, job stress make it hard to be a cop

The role of police is being questioned as never before. In addition to facing increased media scrutiny, officers are being killed. What is the effect on their well-being and, in turn, on ours?
Detail from a satellite photo of Lake Okeechobee’s algae bloom and the St. Lucie canal into which water was released. Rising water levels from heavy winter rains had water managers worried that water would breach the dike. NASA

Why toxic algae blooms like Florida’s are so dangerous to people and wildlife

Toxic algae blooms like the intense one now fouling Florida’s waterways harm wildlife and people in various ways. They're also on the rise.
Nano-architects design materials that can work together at very tiny scales, like these interlocking gears made of carbon tubes and benzene molecules. NASA

Molecular architects: how scientists design new materials

One of the great technological challenges of this century is to design novel items and then make them – and have the results match the intent.
Massive bodies can send ripples through space time in the form of gravitational waves. NASA

Gravitational waves discovered: top scientists respond

The long awaited discovery of gravitational waves has sent ripples through the scientific world. Here top experts respond to the historic announcement.
Entrance to the gate of Nimrod, destroyed by the IS group and digitally reconstructed as part of Project Mosul. Model by ruimx from photos at

Preservationists race to capture cultural monuments with 3D images

Researchers are making 3D scans, architectural plans and detailed photographic records of cultural heritage sites around the world, knowing they could be destroyed at any time.
Flooding during Hurricane Sandy devastated New York City’s transportation and power infrastructure. Jason Howie/flickr

Flood severity along US coastline has worsened

Study finds higher risk of flooding from a combination of storm surge and heavy precipitation, particularly along the East Coast of the US.
The South Australian town of Port Pirie – home to a historic smelter – has some of the worst reported toxic air pollution in Australia. Photo by Imre Hillenbrand

Australia’s dirty secret: who’s breathing toxic air?

Australians living in poorer communities, with lower employment and education levels, as well as communities with a high proportion of Indigenous people, are significantly more likely to be exposed to…
The Indian Myna is an invasive species – but has its behaviour changed in Australia? Wikimedia Commons.

Besieged by destructive plants and animals? Blame epigenetics

Plants and animals that are seemingly harmless in their native habitats can become quite aggressive or even destructive in a new location. Think of the rats that have been a source of human and animal…

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