University of Washington

Founded in 1861 by a private gift of 10 acres in what is now the heart of downtown Seattle, the UW is one of the oldest public universities on the West Coast.

The UW is a multi-campus university in Seattle, Tacoma and Bothell, as well as a world-class academic medical center.

We have 16 colleges and schools and offer 1,800 undergraduate courses each quarter. We confer more than 12,000 bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral and professional degrees annually.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 87 articles

The outdoor retail industry is moving its lucrative trade show out of Utah after disputes with state officials over land conservation. AP Photo/Rick Bowmer

Climate politics: Environmentalists need to think globally, but act locally

President Trump says environmental regulation kills jobs. To fight back, conservation advocates need to show that protecting the environment can produce jobs and local benefits.
Weighing up your votes. northcharleston/flickr

Whose votes count the least in the Electoral College?

The 2016 election made clear that the Electoral College does not weigh votes from all states equally. A new analysis suggests the power of your vote is closely linked to voter turnout in your state.
If carbon regulations restrict how much a company can pollute where it’s located, it could move operations (and jobs) to another country – with no reduction in emissions. billy_wilson/flickr

Here’s a better way to regulate carbon – and change the tired environment-versus-economy debate

Two environmental policy experts offer a more politically palatable way to lower carbon emissions – based on consumption, not conventional regulation.
Union workers supporting coal energy (right) face off against environmentalists in Pittsburgh, 2013. AP Photo/Keith Srakocic

The US environmental movement needs a new message

Most Americans care about the environment, but they didn't vote that way this year. Two political scientists urge the movement to build better connections with blue-collar workers and immigrants.
Gatherers in Cannon Ball, North Dakota celebrate news that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers won’t grant an easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline. AP Photo/David Goldman

Victory at Standing Rock reflects a failure of US energy and climate policy

The protesters have scored a big victory in the Dakota Access Pipeline conflict, but it's served only to illuminate the sharp divisions over energy policy in the US.
In us, on us and all around us. Microbes image via www.shutterstock.com.

Microbes: Our tiny, crucial allies

Long viewed simply as 'germs,' the hidden half of nature turns out to be crucial to the health of people and plants.
What drew white voters to Donald Trump? AP Photo/ Evan Vucci

The real reason Trump won: White fright

Exit polling shows that Hillary Clinton actually won the poor and working class vote. If “Make America Great Again” wasn’t fueled by an angry underclass, what powered it?
Cannabis is on display at Shango Premium Cannabis, in Portland, Oregon, Sept. 30, 2015. Timothy J. Gonzalez/AP

Marijuana legalization: Big changes across country

The trend toward marijuana legalization is growing, but the legality, or illegality, of cannabis at the federal level hasn't changed at all.
What can be done to get more kids interested in STEM? Child image via www.shutterstock.com

Group work gets kids more engaged in STEM

A study with pre-school children found that their motivation and interest improved when they believed they were part of a group.
Most cases of Zika are asymptomatic. Airman Magazine/U.S. Air Force Photo/Tech. Sgt. Brandon Shapiro/Flickr

Zika virus: Only a few small outbreaks likely to occur in the continental US

A computer model suggests that while more cases of Zika can be expected in the continental U.S. outbreaks will probably be small and are not projected to spread.

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