Walter and Eliza Hall Institute

The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute is Australia’s oldest medical research institute, founded in 1915.

The Institute has more than 850 researchers who are working to understand, prevent and treat diseases including: cancers such as breast, blood and bowel cancers; immune disorders such as diabetes, coeliac disease and multiple sclerosis; and infectious diseases including malaria, hepatitis B and HIV.

Our affiliation with The Royal Melbourne Hospital links research outcomes with clinical practice to accelerate discoveries for health and disease. We offer postgraduate training as the Department of Medical Biology of The University of Melbourne.

More than 30 million people worldwide have been helped by discoveries made at the Institute and more than 100 national and international clinical trials are underway that originate from Institute research. This include trials of vaccines and therapies for type 1 diabetes, coeliac disease and malaria; trials of new anti-inflammatory agents for arthritis and other immune disorders; and trials of a new class of anti-cancer drugs, called BH3-mimetics, for treating patients with leukaemia and other cancers.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 59 articles

DNA Nation raises questions of genetics, identity and race. DNA Nation/SBS

DNA Nation raises tough questions for Indigenous Australians

The SBS documentary DNA Nation tracks three people on their 'individual genetic journey'. But for Indigenous Australians in particular, genetic testing is a can of worms - politically, ethically and technically.
Mefloquine’s chemical structure is based on one of the first malaria drugs, quinine, that comes from the bark of South America’s Cinchona tree. Cinchona seedlings being packaged for shipment to make quinine, 1943/NLM

Weekly Dose: mefloquine, an antimalarial drug made to win wars

Mefloquine was one of around 250,000 chemical compounds tested for malaria-killing activity in the 1960s by the United States military who needed to protect troops from malaria in the tropics.
Relapsing infections are critical for sustained malaria transmission in the Asia-Pacific. Mayeta Clark/Walter and Eliza Hall Institute

To eliminate malaria in the Asia-Pacific we need to target recurrent infections

A large number of children with malaria in the Asia-Pacific have relapses of the disease, not new infections. Malaria-programs must target these latent infections to completely eliminate the disease.
Alan Finkel is a well respected member of the Australian scientific community. AAP Image/Alan Porritt

Reaction: Alan Finkel to be Australia’s next Chief Scientist

The scientific community reacts to the news that Dr Alan Finkel has been appointed Australia's New Chief Scientist as of 2016.
There are still barriers to overcome to keep more women in science. CIAT/Flickr

What it’s like to be a woman working in science, and how to make it better

What is it like to be a woman working in the sciences? While there are hurdles to overcome, there are joys as well. The new SAGE initiative hopes to make STEM even more amenable to women.
Postdocs do the lion’s share of research, so maybe it’s time we started listening to them. ∞ katherynemily./Flickr

Voices of a generation: young scientists must be seen and heard

Postdoctoral scientists – postdocs – are the engines of biomedical research. As early career researchers, they conduct the most experiments and are responsible for sculpting how we treat disease in decades…
Blood is categorised by the naturally occurring proteins and sugars on the surface of red blood cells. Jon Åslund/Flickr

Health Check: what does my blood group mean?

Few discoveries have revolutionised the practice of medicine as much as the discovery of human red blood cell groups. Unlike modern vampire and Time Lord mythologies, blood groups don’t have a particular…
Delicious and nutritious … and safe. Sarah Gilbert/Flickr

Safety first – assessing the health risks of GM foods

In this third instalment of GM in Australia – a series looking at the facts, ethics, regulations and research into genetically modified crops – Ashley Ng explains how GM foods are determined safe to eat…
A controversial retracted study has now been republished but there’s little difference between the two papers. Brian Talbot/Flickr

Séralini study is given new life, but where’s the new data?

A controversial 2012 paper on the effects of genetically modified (GM) maize and the herbicide glyphosate on tumour growth in rats – a paper later retracted by the journal – has been republished, with…
The stories behind Australia’s medical successes have often gone unreported. Flickr: jpalinsad360

Five Australian medical stories everyone should know

The history of Australian medical research is an unabashed good news story: it’s led to many astounding yet common medical treatments and to better understanding of disease. In fact, as a society we benefit…
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (red helmet) is briefed about tanks containing radioactive water by Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant chief Akira Ono. EPA/Sankei Shimbun Pool

The case for Mark Willacy’s Fukushima

Many readers will know the name Mark Willacy, an Australian journalist who was the ABC’s North Asian correspondent for five years. On March 11, 2011, he would witness events that would redefine Japan as…
Prime Minister Tony Abbott on the day his government handed down its first Budget. AAP/Lukas Coch

Judgement day for Abbott on science and research funding

When the freshly-minted Prime Minister Tony Abbott declined for the first time since 1931 to appoint a science minister as part of his Cabinet in September last year, he did so having made an election…
Joe Hockey is congratulated after delivering his first budget, which outlined plans for a medical research future fund. aap

No matter how you fund it, medical research is a good investment

The federal government has announced a $20 billion medical research future fund, which is expected to distribute $1 billion to research by 2022-23, doubling its direct medical research funding. The announcement…
There’s no quick fix for the research industry in Australia, it needs a considered approach. Flickr/US Army RDECOM

Research and innovation in Australia need a long-term strategy

Most researchers would agree with the Commission of Audit’s finding that “given overall budget constraints, it is important to take a strategic, whole-of-government approach to where Australia’s research…

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