New understanding of cell growth and movement

Researchers have overturned conventional wisdom on how cell movement across all species is controlled, solving the structure of a protein that cuts power to the cell “motor”. The protein could be a potential drug target for future malaria and anti-cancer treatments.

By studying the structure of actin-depolymerising factor 1 (ADF1), a key protein involved in controlling the movement of malaria parasites, the researchers have demonstrated that scientists’ decades-long understanding of the relationship between protein structure and cell movement is flawed.

ADFs and their genetic regulators have long been known to be involved in controlling cell movement, including the movement of malaria parasites and movement of cancer cells through the body. Anti-cancer treatments that exploit this knowledge are under development.

Read more at Walter and Eliza Hall Institute

Expert Database

Want to write?

Write an article and join a growing community of more than 54,600 academics and researchers from 2,118 institutions.

Register now