Reader, School of Planning and Geography, Cardiff University

In recent years, my work has developed in dialogue with sociologists and geographers, sharing a general concern with human/non-human animal relations and an attentiveness to human/non-human animal encounters and interfaces. I have looked at food practices as one of these interfaces. Inspired by the work of Elspeth Probyn and Sarah Whatmore among others, I have looked at eating as a way 'to find ourselves in various assemblages, produced and producing ourselves anew'.

I have developed a growing interest in how ethical relations are enacted and articulated within the different practices and encounters between human and non-human animals. I have become particularly fascinated by the new technologies and social organisations that are transforming the habitats of both farm animals and humans, new breeds of farm animals and new animal farming systems in which humans and animals interact. These assemblages of animals and farming technologies offer insights into the diversity of ideas about good farming and into the specificity of the perceptions of what constitutes a good life for animals. They also entail different interpretations of the ways in which human and non-human animals can interact.

Experience

  • –present
    Reader, School of Planning and Geography, Cardiff University