Michelle Baddeley

Director, Research Professor Institute for Choice, University of South Australia

Michelle Baddeley is an applied/behavioural economist. Alongside her University of South Australia roles, she is Honorary Professor with the Institute for Global Prosperity, University College London; President-Elect of the Society for the Advancement of Behavioral Economics; and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Behavioral Economics for Policy. She has an active interest in public policy, including roles as Associate Researcher, Energy Policy Research Group, Cambridge; and Associate Fellow, Cambridge Centre for Science and Policy. She was publicly appointed to the UK's Hazardous Substances Advisory Committee (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs), helping to advise the UK government on environmental policy and chemicals regulation.

Her research focuses on decision-making - including in the context of work, housing, health, energy and cybersecurity. She uses a wide range of methods and data - applying econometric tools in analysing data from surveys and experiments, as well as secondary data from statistical databases. She collaborates with other social scientists in mixed methods analyses, to combine the richness and depth of qualitative methods such as interviews and focus groups with the scalability and breadth of quantitative analysis. Her latest methodological interest is in embedding insights from behavioural economics into discrete choice experiments, applied in the context of employment for vulnerable groups, household energy investments and cybersecurity choices. She also collaborates with researchers from a wide range of disciplines - including neuroscience, experimental psychology, computer science, management, medical science and social policy. She has served as a panel member of expert research assessment panels in Australia, the UK, Germany, the Netherlands and USA, including the 2018 ARC Engagement and Impact panel (Social Sciences).

Experience

  • –present
    Research Professor at the Institute for Choice, University of South Australia