Assistant Professor in Environmental History, University of Nottingham

Dr Rob Lambert is a multi-disciplinary academic at the University of Nottingham, working in environmental history and tourism & the environment. He holds a MA (Hons) in Modern History and a PhD in Environmental History from the University of St. Andrews in Scotland.

From 1998-2000 he held a prestigious Leverhulme Research Fellowship at St. Andrews in the field of British environmental history studying the historical relationships between Atlantic grey seals and people. Rob is also Senior Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Western Australia where he delivered the prestigious Alexander Lecture in 2006, taking as his theme ‘Contested Nature in the modern British countryside’.

Expertise:
Environmental history. Tourism and the environment. Sustainable tourism. Eco-tourism. Environmental management. Environmental policy. Birds and birdwatching. British wildlife. Television and radio natural history/wildlife programming. BBC Natural History Unit. Australia and New Zealand ecology. Public history and heritage. Environmental geography. Landscape history. Antarctica.

Over the past few years Dr Lambert has been involved in the making of a number of major natural history and wildlife television series. For example, this has included:

BBC 4 Birds Britannia, four-part series broadcast in November 2010.
BBC 4 Timeshift When Britain Went Wild, broadcast October 2010.
BBC Scotland, Making Scotland's Landscape, broadcast on BBC1 in Scotland and BBC 2 in England during October/November 2010.

Dr Lambert has strong working links with the BBC Natural History Unit in Bristol and he is involved in wildlife documentary-making as both a 'talking head' expert and an academic consultant on scripts. In addition, his work as an international observer of sustainable tourism operations for the International Association of Antarctic Tour Operators (IAATO) in Antarctica has generated a number of media opportunities.

Experience

  • –present
    Assistant Professor in Environmental History, University of Nottingham