Sections

Services

Information

UK United Kingdom

Rethinking capitalism

Readers interested in the emerging politics of the human/non-human and the deep and difficult tensions between capitalism and democracy are bound to find stimulating a recent public lecture by one of the world’s leading social scientists, Bruno Latour.

Delivered in late February 2014 at the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences in Copenhagen, “On some of the affects of capitalism” is Latour’s powerful attempt to raise questions about why it is that we’ve come to accept commodity production and exchange as a naturally given “fact of life”, and what might be done about it. Note his reference to the new science of the making and unmaking of public ignorance (“agnotology”) and to the global significance of a uniquely Australian model of wilful ignorance championed by the Abbott government. Latour calls it the “Australian strategy of voluntary sleepwalking toward catastrophe”.

The full text of the lecture is available here. Followed by a memorable Tony Abbott quotation, the opening moments of the lecture are pasted below:

‘“If the world were a bank, they would have already bailed it out”. Such is the slogan painted by Greenpeace militants in one of their recent campaigns. It says a lot about our level of intellectual corruption that we don’t find such a line simply funny but tragically realistic. It has the same bleak degree of realism as Frederick Jameson’s famous quip that: “Nowadays it seems easier to imagine the end of the world than to imagine the end of capitalism!.”

Bruno Latour, 2013 Polity Press

If you call the world, I mean the world we all live in, “first nature” and capitalism our “second nature” — in the sense of that to which we are fully habituated and which has been totally naturalized — then what those sentences are saying is that the second nature is more solid, less transitory, less perishable than the first. No wonder: the transcendent world of beyond has always been more durable than the poor world of below. But what is new is that this world of beyond is not that of salvation and eternity, but that of economic matters. As Karl Marx would have said, the realm of transcendence has been fully appropriated by banks! Through an unexpected turn of phrase, the world of economy, far from representing a sturdy down to earth materialism, a sound appetite for worldly goods and solid matters of fact, is now final and absolute. How mistaken we were; apparently it is the laws of capitalism that Jesus had in mind when he warned his disciples: “Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will never pass away.” (Matt 24-35).

Bruno Latour, Royal Danish Academy of Sciences, Copenhagen, 26 February 2014 Videnskabernes Selskab/Royal Danish Academy of Sciences

This inversion of what is transitory and what is eternal is no longer a joke, especially since what should be called the “Australian strategy of voluntary sleepwalking toward catastrophe” is being implemented to the full after the last election: not content to dismantle the institutions, scientific establishments and instruments that could prepare his constituency to meet the new global threat of climate mutations, the prime minister, Tony Abbott, is also dismantling, one after the other, most departments of social science and humanities. Such a strategy makes a lot of sense: not thinking ahead is probably, when you are an Australian and given what is coming, the most rational thing to do.

“Not thinking” seems to be the slogan of the day when you consider that in the United States alone something like a billion dollars, yes, one billion, is being spent to generate ignorance about the anthropic origin of climate mutations. In earlier periods, scientists and intellectuals lamented the little money spent on learning, but they never had to witness floods of money spent on unlearning what was already known. While in times past thinking critically was associated with looking ahead and extracting oneself from an older obscurantist past, today money is being spent to become even more obscurantist than yesterday! “Agnotology”, Robert Proctor’s science of generating ignorance, has become the most important discipline of the day.

It is thanks to this great new science that so many people are able to say in their heart “Perish the world, provided my bank survives!”. It is a desperate task to continue thinking when the powers of intelligence are dedicated to shutting down thought and to marching ahead with eyes wide closed.'

Evidence that Latour is on to something was provided just a week later by the after-dinner remarks of Tony Abbott to forestry industry officials. His biblical words deserve deep meditation:

‘Man and the environment are meant for each other. The last thing we do – the last thing we should want – if we want to genuinely improve our environment is to want to ban men and women from enjoying it, is to ban men and women from making the most of it and that’s what you do. You intelligently make the most of the good things that God has given us.’

The full video of Latour’s address in Copenhagen follows:

Royal Danish Academy of Sciences, 26 February 2014

Join the conversation

56 Comments sorted by

  1. Carol Daly

    Director

    An analysis I have been waiting for, thank you John. I will need to reread the lecture a few times and dwell on the theses but the ideas are very challenging and clarifying!

    report
  2. Marcus Finch

    Developer

    Good stuff.

    It is confusing, that ignorance is being promoted rather than action on warming. You'd think that self interest-which seems to be driving this, would dictate mitigation, action etc.

    But no, its about protecting your patch, about paranoia over govt. regulation, about your "rights"-to what? To socialise consequences and privatise profit.

    And Abbott's comments, his belief system, is no more than cargo cult wilful ignorance. To really believe , that the last 3.5 billion years of life on earth were some sort of warmup exercise so that "man" could "make the most of the things..", specifically only the "man" that believes in the bronze age desert god of palestine, makes me physical ill…..

    report
  3. Craig Myatt

    Industrial Designer / R&D

    I am stunned to think it is not only Australians concerned about mr Abbott's compliance with big business / fossil fuel lobbies, and his stunning dishonesty with the electorate. He has also become well known in Europe for this! good.

    report
    1. Jane Middlemist

      citizen

      In reply to Craig Myatt

      Has there ever been a more primitive Prime Minister than the one we have now? Actually spending money to keep people in the dark about what concerns them, their lives, their children's lives - and then he bleats about 'the budget emergency'. Criminal.

      report
    2. Jane Middlemist

      citizen

      In reply to Craig Myatt

      Sorry Craig.
      I googled 'primitive' and the first meaning that came up was 'unsophisticated'. Synonyms also included: savage, brutish, thuggish, oafish, barbarous - just to mention a few.
      I do agree with you about his "deception" : )

      report
    3. Sandor von Kontz

      farmer

      In reply to Jane Middlemist

      You got it Jane, criminal. the Germans introduced the crime of Volksverdummung ( making the people ignorant ) after the war ,as a consequence of their experience with Hitler.

      report
    4. Jane Middlemist

      citizen

      In reply to Sandor von Kontz

      Well done the Germans, Sandor. Learning from experience. I wonder if our pollies ever bother to look at other (successful) countries like Germany and maybe get a clue occasionally …

      report
  4. Amanda Barnes
    Amanda Barnes is a Friend of The Conversation.

    Voter

    We must be careful not to be nihilistic in our response to seemingly irrational behaviour. There is no malevolence here. It is simply blind, stupid inertia in the machine & we need to combat it as such. We are more ingenious & powerful than we let ourselves believe. Small steps...

    report
    1. Sean Douglas

      logged in via email @hotmail.com

      In reply to Amanda Barnes

      "There is no malevolence here." Cite? Evidence? On what basis other than "wishful thinking" do you believe this Amanda?

      imo, what's nihilistic is Abbott and co, for intentionally not wanting to know is "malevolent", it;s callous, it lacks empathy for others, it is insidious acts by these people 'in power'... that is malevolent, no other word for it. to stoop the bottom of the barrel, Hitler's "INTENTIONS" were for the good of all in Europe and for the German nation as it;s leader ..... he only wanted good for people. It was still Malevolent to it's core. Please stop making excuses, and think this through a little more.

      I was never in the Union, I was a business executive with multinationals, and I tell you what this man here says is 100% true and people need to wake up and start defending themselves from this abuse of power. Try this http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-04-16/national-press-club-tony-sheldon/5394944

      report
    2. Janeen Harris

      chef

      In reply to Amanda Barnes

      If the government had no malevolence they wouldn't be threatening the livelihoods of so many people. Austerity has been a disaster in Europe, so why are they going to impose it on the people of Australia?

      report
    3. Amanda Barnes
      Amanda Barnes is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Voter

      In reply to Sean Douglas

      Great link. Sheldon is a fine orator. Thanks, Sean. As to my comment. Let me expand. I have battled with trying to engage with this seeming mindless madness within, what Bruno describes in the link above as second nature. The fact that we are on the threshold of significant physical change with global warming. That we have passed the tipping point of peak resources for many of our scarce minerals & facing the peak of many not so scarce ones. http://www.theguardian.com/environment/blog/2011/oct/31/six-natural-resources-population

      Read more
    4. Amanda Barnes
      Amanda Barnes is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Voter

      In reply to Janeen Harris

      Hi again Janeen, I have expanded on my comment to Sean above. I am talking about the systems that underpin these irrational behaviours rather than individuals. I am with you on Abbott's particular personal characteristics. He is but one amongst many though & knocking one down does not necessarily mean another will not pop up in their place. They are just opportunists but not the drivers of the train.

      report
    5. Sean Douglas

      logged in via email @hotmail.com

      In reply to Amanda Barnes

      "They are just opportunists but not the drivers of the train."

      SPOT ON Amanda, you get it. ( smile )

      report
    6. Sean Douglas

      logged in via email @hotmail.com

      In reply to Amanda Barnes

      Great response Amanda. re "Thinkers need to find ways to grapple with the system not just fixate on individuals." Yes so true. It is one reason why I resist personally attacking everyday 'agw skeptics' and those who resist taxing the hell out of fossil fuels even if they are somewhat concerned about the climate future ... (as if such taxes or ets systems are the solution anyway, which they are not imo).

      re "This is what I meant by nihilism not having a place in the activists arsenal." Ok, I hear…

      Read more
    7. Sean Douglas

      logged in via email @hotmail.com

      In reply to Sean Douglas

      PS an analogy is no one knew that Eddie Obeid owned the restaurants at Circular Key. The "system" was covert. In such situations one starts with the overt, the talking heads first, and challenge their logic and disconnects from reality and common sense persistently, relentlessly until it unravels publicly. imo, so I could be wrong. thx

      report
    8. Amanda Barnes
      Amanda Barnes is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Voter

      In reply to Sean Douglas

      Just a quick note Sean. It is precisely the fact that we must act, that I commented that nihilism doesn't have a place: (nihilism in the literal sense of pessimistic paralysis in the face of seemingly overwhelming odds). Hence my last link to Chomski who has spent a lifetime in trying to put a recognisable shape to the machine. We are much more willing & able to act when we have a bit of an understanding of what it is that we are up against. I agree with both you & Janeen that Abbott & his inner…

      Read more
    9. Sean Douglas

      logged in via email @hotmail.com

      In reply to Amanda Barnes

      aha, sorry I was misinterpreting your nihilism comment, so thx for the clarification. I remember several like Jack Mundy. Where are they now? Well Rudd got a gig at Harvard, so that says it all. All I have is my own voice Amanda, sending a note with info every now and then to a MP, and going to the odd CSG protest. btw I am not a unionist myself, my main career was as a management executive in large corporations and I never had any issues with Union people or workplace reps. I am no ideologue, I don't care who presents common sense, decent values, and reason. Best

      report
    10. Sean Douglas

      logged in via email @hotmail.com

      In reply to Giles Pickford

      Sorry Giles, it's a habit of mine, and i forget not everyone has been online as long as i have. IMO means *in my opinion* ... as Sebastian said, I also used IMHO ... H is for humble, but after years of responses coming back that totally refuted/ignored my claim to a genuine 'humility' and even handedness, I gave up using it. Social media is a pain ... doesn;t matter what you say or how you say 99% of the time. Especially 'humour', always someone out there who won't get the joke. ( smile ) Best to you Giles.

      report
    11. Amanda Barnes
      Amanda Barnes is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Voter

      In reply to Sean Douglas

      Can you clone yourself & replace all those corporate types who are less than evolved? Seriously though, during my uni days I tagged along with the CMFEU & I found the meetings with the 'bosses' to be highly cordial. This artificial us & them mentality that this government promotes is highly damaging to our society. One voice amongst many Sean can be powerful. ;)

      report
    12. Janeen Harris

      chef

      In reply to Sean Douglas

      Forgive them father they know not what they do is a forgiveness of the masses. The leadership know why they do what they do. At the moment the christians in leadership positions seem to have lost the conviction of their faith and still think there are superior and inferior people so therefor suffering is simply a sign of peoples inferiority or "sin". Sinners must suffer. Lacking compassion and care is acceptable when people are responsible for their own misery. It's a problem when those in power feed on misery to build a sense of superiority. Our leader is doing this.

      report
    13. Sean Douglas

      logged in via email @hotmail.com

      In reply to Janeen Harris

      Good summary Janeen. I really like your phrasing above, but especially this line : "Lacking compassion and care is acceptable when people are responsible for their own misery."

      Very true. Empathy is sign of wisdom, maturity, intelligence and charity (love). By their fruits thou shalt know them. (an oldie but a goodie - philosophical and psychological truths transcends time and religion )

      The masses have indeed be been captured by their sophistry and especially through selective presentations of the whole truth via the corporate bought and controlled media. It's as if the world has gone full circle and arrived back in the days of Oliver Twist and transportation to the colonies.

      Consider this PNAS Science Paper from Berkley 2013. http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/business-jan-june13-makingsense_06-21/ and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9RC7KQSdxR0

      report
    14. Sean Douglas

      logged in via email @hotmail.com

      In reply to Amanda Barnes

      One voice? Nobody's Listening - Linkin Park http://youtu.be/kdq_DAjrEVk ( smile )

      Personal experience like yours Amanda really does cut through the rhetoric of self-righteous sociopaths Amanda. The problem being your experience is rare, and the average voter-commenter-author HERE is simply unaware of such realities as they walk to the polling station. Archetypes Amanda, as pointed out by your tip: Alain De Botton talks about the fourth estate with wonderful lucidity here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yKvOW6RwmFg

      Read more
    15. Sean Douglas

      logged in via email @hotmail.com

      In reply to Janeen Harris

      PS for Janeen ... this is the PNAS Science Paper from Berkley 2013 - The Pernicious Effects of Income Inequality: Paul Solman says: "You (Berkley) consistently find that I (the advantaged) begin to attribute success to myself, even though it's a coin flip that got me on this side of the board as opposed to that?" http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/business-jan-june13-makingsense_06-21/ and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9RC7KQSdxR0 -

      Best to you Janeen

      report
    16. Sean Douglas

      logged in via email @hotmail.com

      In reply to Amanda Barnes

      TRY this ..... ( smile ) The Public Opinion Climate
      Spiral of silence theory describes the process by which one opinion becomes dominant as those who perceive their opinion to be in the minority do not speak up because society threatens individuals with fear of isolation. The assessment of one's social environment may not always be correct with reality.

      The spiral of silence occurs on a macro level if more and more members of the perceived minority fall silent. This is when public perceptions…

      Read more
    17. Amanda Barnes
      Amanda Barnes is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Voter

      In reply to Sean Douglas

      Yes, I missed it unfortunately. One of my sons attended it, but was a little too young (13) to really get the best out of it. The second person to ask Alain a question is my niece! I agree, it would be an excellent starter for a Conversation series. I do think that TC do a fine job in providing an antidote to the corrosiveness of the MSM & take the idea of providing intelligent & cogent bias (in the best way possible), as Alain prescribes. Glad you enjoyed it. He is a wonderful thinker & has done a series of talks that are well worth sourcing.

      report
    18. Amanda Barnes
      Amanda Barnes is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Voter

      In reply to Sean Douglas

      This is why we need to have alternative voices speaking out, Sean. Strong ones. Many people think that social media can assist with this. There are so few means for people to address issues such as inequality or global warming on conventional communication sites. Abbott thrives on misinformation. It is the lifeblood of the current ideologically driven conservative actor. We need to take back the internet. ;)

      report
  5. Giles Pickford
    Giles Pickford is a Friend of The Conversation.

    Retired, Wollongong

    We have just heard the Abbott solution to Beggars. Ban them.

    The only way to clean up the mess left by the last government is to block your ears and ban it. Ban getting scientific advice because you are not going to listen to it. Ban refugees because they are just a nuisance. And finally ban poverty. If you ban it poverty will disappear.

    And Abbott was a Rhodes Scholar!!!!

    report
    1. Victor Jones

      Freelance

      In reply to Giles Pickford

      Yeah, Rhodes Scholar. But it wasn't in a complex field - the equivalent of a stock standard undergrad in science.

      report
    2. Jane Middlemist

      citizen

      In reply to Victor Jones

      I looked up his academic record - all B's and C's, pretty good but not an intellectual giant.
      He was good at boxing …

      report
    3. Victor Jones

      Freelance

      In reply to Jane Middlemist

      LOL. B's & C's would put him near the middle of the bell curve. Makes sense.

      report
  6. Sean Douglas

    logged in via email @hotmail.com

    Shouldn't this article also be filed under "Environment + Energy" topics as well as the Climate Change headings? thx

    report
  7. Alan Tait

    Woodcraft

    I wonder if the Tony Abbots of the world will ever get to, or rather, ever be interested in reading to or listening listening to this wonderful lecture. Sadly, in his great ignorance, I think not.......

    report
  8. John Rutherford

    Worker

    The Last statement is a simple manipulation of words and meanings but also shows Mrrrabbitts other side
    It shows that his main enjoyment comes from exploitation and destruction ( as he proposes for the forests) of things his narrow mind cannot understand the function of or of any reason for them being there.
    He might exist in an inner state where he finds ignorance is bliss
    What you see on the outside of a person is a reflection of what is going on inside the person

    report
  9. Neville Mattick
    Neville Mattick is a Friend of The Conversation.

    Grazier: ALP Member at A 4th Generation Grazing Station

    Very thought provoking and edifying indeed - thank you.

    Our problem is not noticing that we survive on 'credit' that is to say Biodiversity is the key to our affluence and as we intrude further into the bounty from Nature with a lashing of ignorance; Then we do so at our peril.

    report
    1. Amanda Barnes
      Amanda Barnes is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Voter

      In reply to Amanda Barnes

      Think about it. Abbott, & many OECD leaders for that matter, are busily disempowering the middle classes. That section of society who lead dissent. The media is busily making murky the waters of science. Intellectual enquiry is being truncated though severe funding cuts in the areas of science & the humanities. The military is getting a massive boost. 2% of GDP over ten years in fact. Abbott is courting Asian finance. The big question is who really owns Antarctica? According to this article the jury is still out. http://www.antarctica.gov.au/about-antarctica/people-in-antarctica/who-owns-antarctica
      Food for thought at least....

      report
  10. Pat Moore

    gardener

    Ominous warning for the ostriches issued by Latour..."not thinking ahead is probably, when you are an Australian and given what is coming, the most rational thing to do." Yes, we knew this global infamy would be coming too once Abbott was put into power by Murdoch for the corporations, mining the most prominent amongst them and the sector at the pointy end of privatised profits and the coming massive socialised losses of the carbonisation of the atmosphere and seas.

    Abbott's words clearly demonstrate…

    Read more
  11. Chris Booker

    Research scientist

    "Uniquely Australian". I think not, sir! Us New Zealanders are giving you a run for your money on head-in-the-sand ignorance and wishful thinking. Is this going to become another Ozzie-Kiwi rivalry to see who's better? ;)

    report
  12. Sean Douglas

    logged in via email @hotmail.com

    Presidential Campaign Politics, Public Opinion and Twitter: How Tweet It Is

    The usage of social media by politicians and political parties has shaped and been shaped by public opinion in recent years. This partly explains why in recent years political campaigns have hired both social media strategists and quantitative analysts familiar with how public opinion is measured and shared on social media sites as an important part of campaign staff.

    This paper will begin by defining public opinion and illustrating how public opinion is shaped and formed through a top-down two-step flow of information from opinion leaders and the media to the general public. Then it will show how the usage of social media by politicians and the media affects public opinion.
    http://conservancy.umn.edu/bitstream/123474/1/Berry_Presidential%20Campaign%20Politics,%20Public%20Opinion%20and%20Twitter%20How%20Tweet%20It%20Is.pdf

    report
  13. Sean Douglas

    logged in via email @hotmail.com

    Social Media and Public Opinion
    Opinion building is strongly connected to the process of shaping human society. Social communication, social networks, and reputation play a key role in this process. Opinion is a result of cultural, political, ideological, and social believes and desires and public opinion is the aggregate of dominant opinions within a society, communicated in public sphere. Social communication through social media is increasing. The way public opinion is formed is strongly influenced by these new media.
    http://mural.uv.es/lubraun/Social-Media-and-Public-Opinion_LucasBraun_2012.pdf

    report
  14. Sean Douglas

    logged in via email @hotmail.com

    Social Networks: the Force Is Strong with These Ones - September 4, 2012 Eugene Kaspersky (Kaspersky Lab anti-malware virus guru)

    “Forming public opinion” via social networks has for several years already been practiced rather successfully by governments [and industry business too] of many countries, no matter their political traditions or leanings.

    With so much open and free (no cost) information on the surface – no digging necessary – folks themselves tell all about their news, interesting…

    Read more
  15. Sean Douglas

    logged in via email @hotmail.com

    News Use Across Social Media Platforms
    How do different social networking websites stack up when it comes to news? How many people engage with news across multiple social sites? And what are their news consumption habits on traditional platforms? As part of an ongoing examination of social media and news, the Pew Research Center in collaboration with the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation analyzed the characteristics of news consumers and the size of their population across 11 social networking sites.
    http://www.journalism.org/2013/11/14/news-use-across-social-media-platforms/

    The State of the News Media 2014 is the eleventh edition of an annual report by the Pew Research Center’s Journalism Project examining the landscape of American journalism.
    http://www.journalism.org/packages/state-of-the-news-media-2014/

    report
  16. Sean Douglas

    logged in via email @hotmail.com

    Jul 12, 2012 Discusses how the explosive spread of social media can be exploited by cyber-criminals to dramatic effect. Eugene Kaspersky on the dangers of social media https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=5h95NiXeR8A [ 3 mins ]

    Nov 8, 2013 A speech by Eugene Kaspersky at the National Press Club in Canberra, Australia. The Borad Talk was designed to bring non-tech journos up to speed on infosec (information technology security) issues
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=6tlUvb26DzI [ 60 mins ]

    In this modern world of 'social media' news feeds, people will ONLY ever receive *news* and *opinion* that already *fits* their *world view* and *political ideology* .. and nothing else.

    report
  17. Sean Douglas

    logged in via email @hotmail.com

    The LNP Facist Corpocracy seems intent on overturning 800 years of liberal western Democratic principle and Legal precedents all the way back to the Magna Carta.
    "Tasmania's new Attorney-General and Justice Minister is standing by the Liberal Government's plans to scrap suspended sentences, despite a backlash from the legal fraternity. Tasmania's Attorney General stands firm on suspended sentences, despite legal backlash" By Ellen Coulter Tue 15 Apr 2014"
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-04-14/tasmania27s-attorney-general-stands-firm-on-suspended-sentence/5389880

    Read more
    1. Sean Douglas

      logged in via email @hotmail.com

      In reply to Sean Douglas

      mmm, this (The LNP Facist Corpocracy seems intent ) was actually meant "tongue in cheek" and not conspiratorial as it sounds, but it got very lost in the telling. oh for the want of an edit button.

      report
  18. Geoff Chambers

    retired

    Are you sure Bruno Latour's lecture was called ‘On some of the affects of capitalism’? As 'one of the world’s leading social scientists' I expect he knows the difference between an affect and an effect.

    I don't understand the point of the two quips he starts with. “If the world were a bank, they would have already bailed it out” seems pretty self-evident. If anything's too big to fail, it's surely the world. Or does Greenpeace think, as orthodox anti-government-intervention capitalists would…

    Read more
  19. Pat Moore

    gardener

    Latour's thesis maintains that capitalism has attained transcendence, presumably his "second nature" definition that is clashing with Gaia's "first nature", that a new fight between these two worlds will define our times and that activists against these extremes of capitalism should ally themselves with the globe/Gaia to bring capitalism back to Earth. That this time the solution won't come from Marxist dialectics but from First Nature. Attained transcendence reminds of Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd…

    Read more
  20. Sean Douglas

    logged in via email @hotmail.com

    Dear Prof Keene, thanks again, for sharing this lecture by Latour. He packs a lot into one hour, it is really quite confronting. ty.

    report
  21. Sean Douglas

    logged in via email @hotmail.com

    WHY DEGROWTH? Dialogue on a pathways towards a smaller SUSTAINABLE ECOLOGICALLY SOUND ECONOMY http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJQdVCwOZ1Y
    This video presentation has much relevance with more physical details behind the content of Latour’s address in Copenhagen. April 16th, 2014 Vancouver Degrowth Event - William Rees is a human ecologist, ecological economist, Professor Emeritus and former Director of the University of British Columbia's School of Community and Regional Planning in Vancouver, Canada…

    Read more
  22. Norm Zinger

    logged in via LinkedIn

    Point well taken yet so studiously ignored. Capitalism slips quietly into so many national discussions and destroys their logic with economic interest. I would like to see a national poll asking "if you had to choose between capitalism and democracy, which would youi choose?" It's a choice we're now making on a daily basis. Keep speaking out, please!

    report