University of Sydney

Established in 1850, the University of Sydney was Australia’s first tertiary education institution. It is committed to maximising the potential of its students, teachers and researchers for the benefit of Australia and the wider world.

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Race Discrimination Commissioner, Tim Soutphommasane, has criticised the lack of diversity in Australian business leaders. Lukas Coch/AAP

Part of what Australians think is good leadership, might just be Anglo traits

Some leadership attributes, like being trustworthy or encouraging, are viewed the same way in all cultures but there are other traits that only spell leadership to people of Anglo-Celtic backgrounds.
Sydney’s WestConnex is being constructed as a “high priority” project, despite its business case failing to meet Infrastructure Australia’s stated requirements. Ben Rushton/AAP

A closer look at business cases raises questions about ‘priority’ national infrastructure projects

Analysis of the business cases for three of the biggest projects deemed "high priority" by Infrastructure Australia raises questions about the process.
Millions more Australians will be diagnosed with having high blood pressure if the recommendations are followed. www.shutterstock.com

New blood pressure guidelines may make millions anxious that they’re at risk of heart disease

Previously, a person would be diagnosed with high blood pressure if their systolic reading was 140mmHg. But it's recommended this threshold be lowered to 130mmHg, which will do more harm than good.
Health objectives are at last being integrated into all levels of planning in New South Wales, from cities and towns to local places and buildings. pisaphotography/Shutterstock

With health assuming its rightful place in planning, here are 3 key lessons from NSW

The connections between city planning and health are many and varied, but getting health objectives integrated into all aspects of planning in New South Wales has been a long struggle.
Songwriters such as Nick Cave (pictured) and the late Yolngu star Gurrumul have often drawn on the scriptures in their work. Paul Bergen/EPA

Why our declining biblical literacy matters

In less than two generations, the proportion of Australians who never pick up a Bible has leapt to seven out of ten. But a robust biblical literacy can help us decode creative works and understand the past.
The familiar images of high-rise development, looking north here from Surfers Paradise, tell only one part of the story of the Gold Coast. Andrew Leach

Looking past the Gold Coast the world sees today

Behind the built-up glitz of Surfers Paradise lies a deep history that has been written and overwritten in successive layers that have become thinner and thinner as time goes on.
In Kyiv in February 2014, riot police line up opposite crosses marking the deaths of protesters. More than 10,000 people have been killed since the Euromaidan protests began in late 2013. Christiaan Triebert/Flickr

Four years after the Euromaidan revolution in Ukraine: key gains and losses

For Ukrainians, the legacy of the Euromaidan revolution is decidedly mixed, and for the protesters who waved European Union flags EU membership now looks like a distant dream.
The study showed that boosting the office temperature a little can save energy and keep office workers comfortable without sacrificing their cognitive performance. Mami Kempe / The Conversation

Chill out. A slightly warmer office won’t make it too hot to think

Our study found that office workers performed just the same, whether the air conditioning was set at 22°C or 25°C. But making that tweak can cut energy use by 18%.
Beethoven monument on the Beethovenplatz square in Vienna, Austria. The monument was unveiled in 1880. Shutterstock

How Beethoven’s ‘mistake’ became one of our most famous tunes

The last movement of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony gave us 'Ode to Joy', one of the most famous tunes of all time. But the composer initially thought he'd made a grave mistake with it.
Ten-year-old Stanton in the ruins of his home following the earthquake that hit Papua New Guinea in February. EPA/Thomas Nybo/UNICEF

Aftershocks hit Papua New Guinea as it recovers from a remote major earthquake

Fresh earthquakes and aftershocks hit parts of Papua New Guinea following February's deadly quake. It's Australia's slow push north that's part of PNG's seismic activity.
Through their commitments to, and dependence on, professional education and multidisciplinary research, universities have skin in the epistemic game. Shutterstock

Universities should take stronger leadership on knowledge and how it matters

It’s time to (do more than) talk about knowledge. Universities must take leadership in helping develop students capacity to recognise different kinds of knowledge and work flexibly.
We’re used to hearing cries of “NIMBYism” and “money-hungry developers” on both sides of planning debates, but there’s actually more subtlety to interactions around urban planning that are worth exploring and understanding. Joel Carrett/AAP

Speaking with: Cameron McAuliffe on NIMBYs, urban planning and making community consultation work

Speaking with: Cameron McAuliffe on NIMBYs, urban planning and making community consultation work.
Dallas Rogers speaks with Western Sydney University's Cameron McAuliffe about leveraging conflict and informal processes in the urban planning process.

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