Articles on K-12 education

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Most kids get dismissed from school hours before the workday ends. MiniStocker/Shutterstock.com

Free preschool, longer school days and affordable day care help keep moms in the paid workforce

When families need to spend more time and money taking care of their kids on weekdays, it can take a toll on careers – especially for women.
New data show more girls and minority students are taking advanced computer science courses in high school. Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com

Boost in high school students taking advanced computer science could change the face of tech

New data show more girls and minority high school students taking Advanced Placement courses in computer science. A computer science professor weighs in on what that means for the future of the field.
Corporal punishment in schools around the world is disappearing, but a handful of countries have held on to the practice. Cat Act Art/Shutterstock.com

School spankings are banned just about everywhere around the world except in US

While more and more countries have moved to ban corporal punishment in schools, certain types of nations have been slower than others to outlaw the practice. A recent analysis seeks to explain why.
Lead-based paint is being found in roughly half of schools that do inspections, a federal report reveals. Carlos Osario/AP

Lead-based paint found in half of all inspected schools

A federal report reveals that most school districts are failing to inspect their buildings for lead-based paint hazards and, when they do, often fail to tell parents about what they found.
A 1974 Supreme Court decision found that school segregation was allowable if it wasn’t being done on purpose. AP

The Supreme Court decision that kept suburban schools segregated

When the Supreme Court exempted suburbs in the North from the kind of desegregation orders imposed in the South, it enabled the 'de facto' segregation that continues in America's schools to this day.
Brandon Fant, left, gets his blood tested for lead poison levels by Lashae Campbell at a clinic in Flint, Michigan. Jim Young/Reuters

How the Flint water crisis set students back

The children who suffered lead poisoning as a result of the Flint water crisis of 2014 are likely to struggle academically and socially as a result, an expert on treating lead-poisoned children argues.
Educators often fail to recognize fathers, a researcher contends. Brad Tollefson/AP

Divorced dads often dissed by schools

When children don't live with their fathers, educators often act as if the men don't exist, an expert on child development laments in an essay about why schools must do more to recognize dads.
Adolf Hitler (second from the right in front) is shown in this 1939 file photo along with German and Italian army chiefs after having signed the German-Italian military pact in Germany. AP

I was an expert witness against a teacher who taught students to question the Holocaust

A scholar's efforts to learn how textbooks in New Jersey were portraying the Holocaust leads her to testify against a history teacher who taught his students to question if the Holocaust took place.
Despite being known for high college acceptance rates, Urban Prep Academies recently lost a charter to operate a school on Chicago’s west side. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

Chicago’s Urban Prep Academy – known for 100% college acceptance rates – put reputation ahead of results

Urban Prep Academy in Chicago made a name by boasting about its 100% college acceptance rates for graduating seniors. A founding teacher at Urban Prep explains why that statistic is misleading.
Students’ home and family backgrounds will be factored into their SAT scores. Monkey Business Images/www.shutterstock.com

The SAT’s new ‘adversity score’ is a poor fix for a problematic test

The College Board is adding a new 'adversity score' to the SAT to take students' socioeconomic backgrounds into account. Will the move correct long-standing disparities in the college entrance exam?
Thurgood Marshall outside the Supreme Court in Washington in 1958. Marshall, the head of the NAACP’s legal arm who argued part of the case, went on to become the Supreme Court’s first African-American justice. AP

The Brown v. Board of Education case didn’t start how you think it did

While the Brown vs. Board of Education case is often celebrated for ordering school desegregation, history shows many black people in the city where the case began opposed integrated schools.

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