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Even people who accept the science of climate change sometimes resist it because it clashes with their personal projects. from www.shutterstock.com

Climate explained: why some people still think climate change isn’t real

People are more likely to deny climate change if they're inclined toward hierarchy, have lower levels of education or are more religious. But the strongest predictor of denial is a person's politics.
During the Pliocene, up to one third of Antarctica’s ice sheet melted, causing sea-level rise of 20 metres. from www.shutterstock.com

If warming exceeds 2°C, Antarctica’s melting ice sheets could raise seas 20 metres in coming centuries

New research shows that warming by more than 2°C could be a tipping point for Antarctica's ice sheets, resulting in widespread meltdown and changes to the world's shorelines for centuries to come.
Australian tennis player Nick Kyrgios was sentenced to six months of probation following several controversial events and an ‘aggravated pattern of behaviours’. EPA/Jason Szenes

Nick Kyrgios on probation: can controversial athletes sell a sport or are they bad for the business?

As Australian tennis player Nick Kyrgios begins his probationary period this week for a pattern of bad behaviour and foul language, his value to sponsors and the sport of tennis remains high.
Eating less meat is one change many of us can make to reduce our contribution to climate change. from www.shutterstock.com

Climate explained: what each of us can do to reduce our carbon footprint

Individual actions to reduce emissions are important in two ways. First, they have an immediate impact, and secondly, adopting low-carbon life choices sends a clear message to political leaders.
People with depression experience symptoms that affect their mood, cognitive function and physical health. from www.shutterstock.com

Depression: it’s a word we use a lot, but what exactly is it?

Understanding of depression has advanced significantly since the first diagnostic criteria were introduced in the 1980s, but we still lack clear consensus on how this mental disorder should be explained.
Tax reforms generally imply a trade-off between average income and inequality. from www.shutterstock.com

How raising tax for high-income earners would reduce inequality, improve social welfare in New Zealand

At 33%, New Zealand's highest income tax rate is relatively low compared to other economies. Lifting it and cutting tax for low-income earners could improve welfare.
Governments can choose to spend money in ways that support climate change policy, including a shift to electric vehicle fleets. from www.shutterstock.com

Procurement’s role in climate change: putting government money where policy needs to go

New Zealand is introducing new procurement rules to better link government spending with climate change policy. The first target is to reduce emissions profile of the government's vehicle fleet.
After winning the right to vote in 1893, New Zealand’s suffragists kept up the battle, but the unity found in rallying around the major cause had receded. Jim Henderson/Wikimedia Commons

NZ was first to grant women the vote in 1893, but then took 26 years to let them stand for parliament

New Zealand was the first nation to grant women the vote in 1893, but during the pre-war years enduring prejudice against women in politics outweighed any support for women to stand for parliament
Since the industrial revolution began in the mid-1700s, atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations have gone up by 46%. from www.shutterstock.com

Climate explained: why we won’t be heading into an ice age any time soon

For the past two and a half million years, Earth has experienced regular ice ages, but with carbon dioxide levels now over 400 parts per million, the next ice age is postponed for a very long time.
The climate crisis is itself an appalling lapse in duty of care by decision-makers, but we shouldn’t overlook this duty in our response. from www.shutterstock.com

Why our response to climate change needs to be a just and careful revolution that limits pushback

Climate change is a super-wicked problem. With a growing sense of urgency to act on climate change, it is vital we strike a balance between encouraging action and limiting pushback.
Auckland Council’s upgrade plans highlight the importance of local Māori communities as part of the process. from www.shutterstock.com

If Auckland’s plan to include Māori histories in city centre upgrade is genuine, it must act on inequalities

As part of an upgrade of Auckland's city centre, the council promises to include local Māori communities and their histories. But without addressing inequalities, it is no more than a token gesture.

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