Articles on US Constitution

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Together no more: remote voting for Congress could be the outcome of public health restrictions on gatherings. House of Representatives

Coronavirus restrictions could lead to remote voting for Congress

It may become impossible for the hundreds of members of Congress to meet in person. One legal scholar says the language the Founders used 233 years ago could allow voting remotely.
Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, at a Senate GOP lunch meeting on March 20, 2020, to discuss the ‘phase 3’ coronavirus stimulus bill. Getty/ Drew Angerer

How one federal agency took care of its workers during the yellow fever pandemic in the 1790s

Today's coronavirus pandemic has echoes in the yellow fever pandemic of the 1790s. Then, as now, workers struggled with how to support themselves and their families. One federal agency had the answer.
Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase presided over the Senate during President Andrew Johnson’s impeachment trial. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper/Wikimedia Commons

The Senate has actually tied in an impeachment trial – twice

In 1868, during the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson, the Senate tied on two votes. Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase broke both ties.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., during debate over rules for the Senate impeachment trial against President Donald Trump, Jan. 21, 2020. Senate Television via AP

Precedent? Nah, the Senate gets to reinvent its rules in every impeachment

Certain words are being used over and over during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. One of them is 'precedent.' What does it really mean?
In an official White House photo, President Donald Trump stands alone. Shealah Craighead/White House

Trump, like Obama, tests the limits of presidential war powers

Both President Trump and President Obama used military force without informing Congress, or getting its approval. But the differences reveal more than the similarities.
Republican lawmakers are seen as Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) oversees a vote on the second article of impeachment against President Donald Trump in the House of Representatives, Dec. 18, 2019. Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Congressional Republicans abandon constitutional heritage and Watergate precedents in defense of Trump

An expert on Watergate says that today's House Republicans have taken precisely the opposite position than the GOP took in 1974 on the president's power to withhold documents from Congress.
Top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine William Taylor, left, and Foreign Service officer George Kent are sworn in before the House Intelligence Committee during the first public impeachment hearing. AP/Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool Photo

Impeachment: Two quotes that defined the first day of public hearings

The first day of public impeachment testimony was defined, in part, by strongly worded statements from Representatives Adam Schiff and Devin Nunes.
The Capitol on the morning after Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announced the House of Representatives will vote on a resolution to affirm the impeachment investigation. AP/J. Scott Applewhite

Impeachment resolution: 3 reasons the House voted even though the Constitution doesn’t require it

The House of Representatives voted Thursday on a resolution that laid out a process for the inquiry into the impeachment of President Donald Trump. But was the resolution constitutionally necessary?
U.S. forces are still in Syria, but their role has changed substantially in recent weeks. AP Photo/Baderkhan Ahmad

Could Congress reverse Trump’s decision to pull troops out of Syria?

Since the 1940s, Congress has largely let the president make decisions, while members of the House and Senate endorse or condemn those actions from the sidelines.
President Donald Trump simulates a law enforcement officer holding a gun at the International Association of Chiefs of Police Convention in Chicago. If Trump’s support continues to fade, more senators will break from him because their voters demand it. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

If Trump gets impeached, don’t thank the U.S. founders and their elitist constitution

If the U.S. Senate agrees to hear the articles of impeachment for Trump, it is not because of the U.S. founders' commitment to democracy, but rather in spite of their elitist design.
US Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks during her weekly press briefing on October 8, 2019. She accused the White House of an “unlawful attempt to hide the facts” after it ruled out cooperating with an impeachment probe of President Donald Trump. Andrew Caballero/AFP

Trump and Nixon: Three key differences between 2019 and 1974

The impeachment investigation of US president Donald Trump has formally started, but much has changed since 1974, when Richard Nixon was forced out of office.
Kentucky Republican Mitch McConnell, the senate majority leader, has a lot of power. AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley

Impeachment comes to the Senate – 5 questions answered

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is known as a master of Senate rules. If the House impeaches President Trump, what could he do to influence the process – and outcome – of a trial?

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